Child-Friendly Schools Case Study: China

Author: 
Zhou Nanzhao
September 1, 2009

From the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), this case study explores UNICEF China's child-friendly schools (CFS) project, which was initiated in 2001 in an effort to: expand inclusive education

Contact Information: 
Source: 

UNICEF website and UNICEF China website - both accessed on February 11 2011. Image credit: © UNICEF/China/Liu Yu

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Mobile Phone Networks Champion Social Change in the Third World

Author: 
Ross Biddiscombe
June 18, 2010
Affiliation: 

The Guardian

According to this article from The Guardian: "Money transfer, healthcare, farming and education are all areas now covered in the developing world by rapidly spreading mobile phone networks."

Contact Information: 
Source: 

The Guardian, July 18 2010. Image source: Vodafone

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China's Telecoms Revolution

Author: 
Cheng Donghong
Jia Hepeng
February 17, 2010

In this SciDev.

Contact Information: 
Source: 

SciDev.Net Weekly Update, February 15 - 21 2010.

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Scientist-Salesmen Fail to Convince Chinese Public

Author: 
Yidong Gong
August 13, 2009
Affiliation: 

SciDev.Net

According to this SciDev.Net article from Bejing, China, "Widespread mistrust of scientists who make claims in advertisements has emerged from China's annual report on science communication.

Contact Information: 
Source: 

SciDev.Net Weekly Update on August 17 2009. Image courtesy of United States Department of Agriculture/Scott Bauer.

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Sensors and Sensitivity

June 4, 2009

This article from Economist.com describes mobile phone data collection, focusing on new ways to gather information, both manually and automatically, over wide areas. Possible uses include: gathering personal data like patterns of travel, schedules, contents of text messages, personal preferences, and personal contacts; group data like social groups, traffic movement, and disease spread; and whatever data might be gathered by sensors, which if put inside phones, or attached to them, could gather information about temperature, humidity, noise level, and so on.

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Source: 

Economist.com website accessed on October 12 2009. Image source: Economist.com.

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China Promotes Distance Education through the "Classroom on the Air"

March 20, 2009

This article from United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Bangkok describes an advancement in the development of distance education in China.

Contact Information: 
Source: 

UNESCO Bangkok's News on ICT in Education, March 23 2009.

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Goals for Girls

Communication Strategies: 

This campaign uses the power of sport and the appeal of football and the FIFA Women's World Cup 2007 as platforms for helping challenge gender discrimination and empowering women and girls. The campaign promotes education for girls and CFS, a philosophy centring around emphasis on the needs of the whole child. CFS promotes an integrated approach to a healthy, safe, and protective environment for children's emotional, psychological, and physical well-being, including school-based health and nutrition services, life skills, and provision of separate water and sanitation facilities for boys and girls. A CFS encourages gender-sensitive learning by providing an intellectually challenging educational setting for both girls and boys.

All campaign materials centre around 'Nu', a single Chinese language character signifying a female figure in motion - running, dancing, moving forward. While 'Goals for Girls!' is the slogan at a global level, the Chinese translation of 'Equality Creates Opportunities' is the slogan in China.

The logo and slogan are prominent in UNICEF's Sport-in-a-Box kits, which containing footballs, basketballs, skipping ropes, and other equipment to allow children the opportunity to enjoy a variety of games during playtime. UNICEF also launched a series of multilingual public service announcements (PSAs) using FIFA tournament footage. In addition to being seen on television around the world, they were played for football fans before each of the matches in China. The PSAs highlight the links between girls playing in their own communities and the stars who make it to the top, carrying the central message that through sport – and education – any girl can achieve what those stars have achieved. An interactive campaign website in the Chinese language was also developed.

Development Issues: 

Gender, Education.

Key Points: 

Speaking at the campaign launch, UNICEF Deputy Regional Director for Asia and the Pacific underlined that "children, everywhere in the world, have the right to education. Educating girls is key to the fight against poverty, protecting them against violence and exploitation, and informing them about the risks of AIDS. Sport can really help in this aspect."

UNICEF's report "The State of the World's Children 2007" showed how efforts to eliminate gender discrimination and empower women impact the survival and well-being of children, and are "pivotal to the health and development of families, communities and nations. This report focuses on a number of key interventions to enhance gender equality, including "women empowering women", arguing that women themselves are the most important catalysts for change.

According to FIFA, "Sport can help girls and young women claim their place in society. It can provide girls, who are often under tremendous pressure to begin sexual activity and child­bearing early, a chance to exert more control over their lives. It can help girls gain respect for their bodies and develop self-esteem. It allows them to form friendships. It teaches girls self-sufficiency, personal autonomy and leadership. Challenging the stereotype that girls are weaker than boys, sport exposes girls to female role models, making goals in other areas of their lives seem attainable."

Editor's note: The Goals for Girls! campaign at the FIFA Women's World Cup China 2007 is independent of the Goals for Girls programme of DC Soccer, which aims to help girls achieve their full potential through the medium of soccer. Click here to learn more about that programme.

Partner Text: 

FIFA, UNICEF.

Source: 

FIFA website, July 28 2009; and UNICEF website.

Culture-based Development to Eradicate Poverty

Communication Strategies: 

The programme will involve various strategies to draw upon culture as a means for fighting poverty. For example, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) will raise awareness of local stakeholders about cultural diversity through the introduction of a "Cultural Diversity Programming Lens" so that governance processes are more inclusive of ethnic minorities and sensitive to culturally-based development strategies. Developed by UNESCO Bangkok, this framework is an interdisciplinary tool to systematically analyse and evaluate whether programmes, policies, and practices do in fact incorporate and promote the principles enshrined in the adopted Declarations and Conventions.

 

Collaborators will also undertake cultural mapping and museum enhancement to improve the proficiency of ethnic minorities to understand and protect cultural capital and awareness of cultural diversity. UNESCO Office Beijing's Culture Section is involved in a myriad of activities, ranging from examining the roles of museums in public participation and education outreach to providing individual museums with assistance. Connected with this work will be the development of cultural tourism to build competence to manage minority community resources and leverage tourism for local livelihoods. UNESCO Office Beijing's Culture Section assists and advises the cluster country member states in sustainable tourism development, i.e. through attendance of tourism workshops and meetings, through workshops and seminars, and through dissemination of materials and tools relevant to the planning and development of sustainable cultural tourism. This also includes assistance to World Heritage Sites so that tourism development does not negatively affect the conservation of those sites.

 

This project will also undertake capacity building based on the criteria and conditions of UNESCO's Award of Excellence for Handicrafts programme to strengthen its institutional environment for ethnic minority arts and crafts. This award programme was established in 2002 to encourage craft-workers to use traditional skills and materials so as to ensure the perpetuation of traditional knowledge and to preserve cultural diversity. It is also set up with the goal of setting quality standards for handicrafts and raising international awareness of Asian handicraft products, in order to enlarge and strengthen the market for these products. A strong market ensures that the production of these handicrafts provides the producers with a viable livelihood and long-term employment. According to UNESCO, by participating in the programme, craft producers benefit in various ways, including:

  1. They receive a certificate of excellence, which can be used as a promotional tool (for this specific product or product line only) to attest the quality and authenticity of a product.
  2. UNESCO assists national and sub-regional partners in organising workshops on product assessment, design, and promotion for the producers of awarded products and programme applicants.
  3. Producers have the opportunity to display the awarded product at annual exhibitions and fairs and will receive guidance about participating in international trade fairs.
  4. Producers benefit from the communication and promotion campaign coordinated by UNESCO and its partners. Promotional materials, such as brochures and catalogues, are designed to enhance the product visibility and acknowledgment.
  5. All awarded products, together with producers’ information data, are listed on the UNESCO Bangkok website so that interested persons can directly communicate with producers.
  6. Producers of the awarded handicrafts are sensitised on the benefits of registering their products under intellectual property rights regimes.
Development Issues: 

Poverty.

Key Points: 

China has 106 million ethnic minority communities, and is struggling to help lift them out of poverty.

Partner Text: 

Funded by the Spanish Government through the Millennium Development Goal Fund - Culture and Development window. The eight participating UN agencies Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Labour Organization (ILO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), World Health Organization (WHO), and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The State Ethnic Affairs Commission (SEAC) in China is also assisting.

Contact Information: 
Source: 

VOICES, UNESCO in the Asia-Pacific, No. 18, April-June 2009 (page 20) - sent to The Communication Initiative on April 6 2009; UNESCO Bangkok website; and UNESCO Beijing website.

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