Benin Integrated Family Health Project

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Working since 2006 in the department of Zou-Collines, the Integrated Family Health Project, also known by its French acronym PISAF, focuses on maternal and neonatal health, child health, malaria, family planning, and HIV/AIDS. PISAF's three main objectives are to create a supportive implementation environment, increase access to quality services and products, and increase demand for health services, products, and preventive measures.

Communication Strategies: 

PISAF's activities are designed to support the Government of Benin’s national policies and strategies to improve the health status of the people of Benin. PISAF collaborates with non-governmental organisations (NGOs), government agencies, other donors and USAID projects, communities, and the private sector, including 147 public and 28 private health facilities. In late 2010, PISAF received additional resources to focus on the prevention and repair of obstetric fistula and improvements in vaccination coverage in Zou/Collines.

PISAF’s approach includes developing an integrated family health service delivery package; increasing access to services and essential family health medicines through logistics support; and supporting service integration, monitoring, and outreach support, among other strategies. In terms of communication, PISAF’s strategy focuses on community mobilisation campaigns to increase demand for quality products and services, as well as raising awareness among communities, health workers, and others about the causes, prevention, and treatment of malaria.

In 2009, PISAF produced and disseminated information, education and communication and behaviour change communication tools. This included updating the inventory of available IEC materials, analysing the materials for community relevance, and then adapting or translating them into local languages. Noting a lack of IEC/BCC media in the waiting rooms of health facilities in Zou/Collines, PISAF recorded a 50-minute DVD to be shown at clinics, entitled Le Bonheur du Ménage (The Happy Household) with two parts: 1) an awareness sketch on FP and 2) accounts from women, men, and community leaders on the advantages of family planning.

PISAF also implemented multimedia campaigns on family health issues to provide accurate health information to the communities. For example, PISAF signed ten partnership contracts with local radio stations, and service contracts with three popular theater companies, one primary school theater company, and one popular traditional musical group to create family health programming. In addition, 15 hosts from radio stations received training on designing, editing, and broadcasting radio messages to prevent and treat uncomplicated malaria in the home, prevent sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS, and on Mutual Health Organizations (MHOs), a new community level health insurance system. This culminated with the development of eight scripts for spots on MHOs that were translated into three languages, and then recorded, edited, and made ready for broadcasting.

PISAF also collaborated with local elected officials to involve them effectively in malaria control efforts in Zou/ Collines, providing orientation about the causes, signs, consequences, prevention, and treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the home. According to PISAF, after receiving training these leaders committed to direct involvement in controlling malaria in Zou/Collines through social mobilisation and advocacy activities.

As part of providing community-based care, community liaisons were trained in the management of childhood illnesses. Monthly follow-up sessions with community liaisons were held to strengthen their capacities, in particular in completing the management tools. Community stakeholders and care providers were also trained to improve the quality of services and care and to strengthen preventive measures by implementing awareness campaigns.

Through the President’s Malaria Initiative, PISAF is building the capacity of health services staff and managers and strengthening facility-based services. It is also working to build stronger data collection and reporting systems for malaria at the national level, as well as build the capacity of health services staff and managers and strengthen facility-based services.

Development Issues: 

Maternal health, Child health, Malaria, Family planning, HIV/AIDS

Key Points: 

According to PISAF, achievements have included the following:

  • identified and referred 39 cases of obstetric fistula from Zou/Collines for repair, with an overall success rate of 79% in a four-month period;
  • evaluated health system management in Zou/Collines, thus providing information on the current level of indicators calculated in 2006 to determine the progress PISAF had made;
  • Designed logistics management software and a web platform, Medistock, and scaled it up to the national level; ;
  • through the malaria collaborative, helped 52 health facilities in Zou/Collines increase their performance by 52% in treating febrile children under five with artemisinin-combination therapies (ACTs); and
  • facilitated the creation of 57 mutuelles to improve financial access to health services and spearheaded a national forum to enhance the professionalism of these organisations and promote collaboration among them.

Fundación Huésped - Huésped Foundation - Argentina

Cadena

Fundación Huésped is an Argentinean organisation that has been part of the fight against AIDS since 1989. The foundation sees AIDS as both a biological disease that is transmitted between people as well as an important social problem that requires an adequate community environment to support people living with the HIV virus. The foundation’s objectives are:

Communication Strategies: 

General strategies for prevention stem from the assumption that information and training are basic tools to combat AIDS.

  • Holistic AIDS prevention;
  • Social and epidemiological investigations in diverse populations;
  • Training and technical assistance for community groups and organisations, and healthcare and education stakeholders who are involved with the issue;
  • Broad prevention strategies directed at both the general population and vulnerable groups;
  • Organisation of local networks and mobilisation of diverse stakeholders: healthcare stakeholders, the educational system, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), community organisations, and groups of people who live with HIV.
  • Multiplication of public prevention messages among peers, community participation, and local leadership development;and
  • Advocacy for specific public policies through the coordination with municipal and provincial decision-makers. 

 

The foundation develops printed materials and public campaigns (graphic, radio, and television materials) in order to make information about AIDS available to everyone in clear, simple, and effective ways. In May 2005, the foundation launched a new prevention campaign, "Yo también," (Me, too). In this campaign, people wear red, silicon bracelets to make their participation in the fight against AIDS public. "Yo también" provides a vehicle to openly support the fight against the epidemic, to show solidarity with people living with HIV/AIDS, and to propagate a message of social commitment capable of multiplying among the population.

 

Huésped views its strategy to get prevention messages into the mass media as key to stopping the spread of AIDS and reducing stigma and discrimination. Every year on December 1st, World AIDS Day, the foundation puts a television program on Channel 13 with time donated by the station, the actors, and others, to raise awareness about HIV/AIDS. The programmes, which are available on the foundation website are Sútiles Diferencias (Subtle Differences), Revelaciones (Revelations), Oportunidades (Opportunities), Reparaciones (Reparations), Hoy Me Desperté (Today I Woke Up), Cortos que Animan (Motivating Shorts), and Preventoons (cartoons for primary school children on HIV/AIDS prevention).

 

Current campaigns include a blog called "Espacio Positivo" (Positive Space) and active sites on social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, Sonico, Taringa. The campaigns present many videos, spots, and presentations on YouTube.

 

Fundación Huésped: provides technical and methodological training for primary and middle school teachers; works with NGOs and community groups to raise awareness; trains managerial personnel at major corporations such as Burger King and Starbucks; coordinates internships at the university level, as well as a Masters level public health degree with an emphasis on HIV/AIDS; and provides virtual training yearly to infectious disease medical personnel to keep them abreast of the latest in HIV/AIDS research.

 

Fundación Huésped also provides free legal assistance and free psychological services, participates and runs clinical investigations, runs a bio-ethics committee that looks out for the respect of human beings during procedures, and operates a network of volunteers who serve HIV/AIDS patients with everything from accompaniment and conversation to orientation for family members.

Development Issues: 

HIV/AIDS, Youth

Key Points: 

The Huésped Foundation provides economic support for the Home "Los Querubines" which is located in the northern part of Greater Buenos Aires and houses at risk children and abandoned children living with the HIV virus or children who lost their parents to AIDS. The Foundation also annually finances 500 "cluster of differentiation 4" (CD4) and viral load studies (both studies related to immunie systems and HIV) for low-income patients at five Argentinean hospitals.

 

In many of its focused interventions, the foundation prioritises work in vulnerable communities with less education and who belong to the poorest and most excluded sectors of society. In 2000, the foundation launched the Braille Red Ribbon project that provides information on HIV/AIDS to blind and vision-impaired people in Braille and through talking books.

Partner Text: 

Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires, Fondo Mundial de Lucha contra el Sida, la Tuberculosis y la Malaria, and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (ONUSIDA), among others.

Contact Information: 
Source: 

Fundación Huésped webpage, November 8 2011.

Tchova Tchova, Juntos Vamos Mudar

Tchova Tchova, Juntos Vamos Mudar (Push, Push, Together We Are Going to Change), the Social and Behavioral Change Communication project for HIV/AIDS Prevention, Treatment and Capacity Building was a 3-year project (2007-2010) carried out by the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (JHUCCP) and partners in Mozambique. CCP implemented a coordinated communication approach to target one of the main drivers of the HIV/AIDS epidemic - multiple concurrent partnerships (MCP) - by tackling underlying social and gender factors.

Communication Strategies: 

Tchova Tchova used large-scale communication interventions and community-based approaches in an effort to catalyse change in harmful social and behavioural norms through:

  • A 12-minute radio magazine - Tchova Tchova - Escutando Podemos Mudar (Push, Push - Through Listening We Can Change) - which addressed a variety of HIV/AIDS-related topics through 34 programmes, which featured the entertainment-education strategy.
  • An HIV/AIDS prevention gender tool - Tchova-Tchova Histórias de Vida Diálogos Comunitários (TTHV) - which features - amongst other elements - 10 video and written profiles of Mozambican "positive deviant" men, women, and couples telling their stories of how they overcame gender, cultural, and social barriers with a specific focus on HIV treatment and prevention. [Editor's note: see "Related Summaries" below to access this tool.]
  • A partnership with Moçambique em Acção (Mozambique in Action), the social responsibility division of Mozambique's STV main private broadcaster, to produce and air ten 2-hour television programmes in which the TTHV video profiles were presented and then discussed with a panel of adults.
  • A project to dub 26 episodes of the South African HIV/AIDS drama series Tsha Tsha into Portuguese and to produce facilitation guides to be used at the community level, linking up with the TTHV initiative.
  • A multimedia campaign - Andar Fora e Maningue Arriscado (Stepping out Is Very Risky) - on the risks of multiple concurrent partnerships (MCP) and social approval of new social and gender norms among married couples.
  • An expansion of the HIV/AIDS Advocacy Toolkit for District Administrators, which reached 750 political and community leaders (regulos, traditional healers, rite of passage counsellors, religious leaders, and village secretaries). [Click here to access a set of visual cue cards featuring topics such as MCP, HIV/AIDS-tuberculosis (TB) co-infection, stigma at the community level, and the protection of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC).]
  • An effort to increase the quantity and quality of media coverage of HIV/AIDS issues through 3 training workshops for 75 journalists and social communicators, the purpose of which was to build journalists' skills as well as to share accurate information on HIV/AIDS transmission patterns and preventive behaviours - as well as the formation of a Media Journalist Network.

In addition, Tchova Tchova worked in the area of communication for HIV prevention and treatment services. Specifically, JHUCCP assisted the Ministry of Health (MOH) to increase treatment-seeking behaviours and anti-retroviral therapy (ART) literacy and adherence, as well as to reduce stigma and promote HIV services. JHUCCP produced a package of training materials and a set of job aids (Six Tips for Interpersonal Communication), and the project supported the development of a set of counselling and communication tools for providers across HIV services and client materials.

 

Finally, Tchova Tchova endeavoured to strengthen capacity among Conselho Nacional de Combate ao HIV/Sida em Moçambique / National AIDS Council (CNCS) and MOH Education Unit staff to conduct large-scale communication strategies and coordinate mass media and communication activities at the national and provincial level.

Development Issues: 

HIV/AIDS, Gender.

Partner Text: 

JHUCCP with World Vision, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, and N'Weti to support the Mozambique Ministry of Health, National AIDS Council, and many civil society and media organisations. Funding from the United States (US) President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).

Contact Information: 
See video
Source: 

JHUCCP website, October 31 2011.

Talking Frankly

Developed with children in grades six through ten across Jordan, Talking Frankly is designed to make school a place to learn about making healthy lifestyle choices and adopting health behaviours. An initiative of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Jordan Health Communication Partnership (JHCP) as part of a private-public partnership, Taking Frankly was launched in 2009 and has since been implemented in over 40 schools in an effort to raise awareness about the health issues that arise with puberty.

Communication Strategies: 

This initiative involved the provision of information in the form of printed materials, including: the installation of 18 health rooms in girls' schools where the girls receive general information about health issues and can acquire feminine hygiene products; the development and distribution of two booklets (for boys and girls) addressing a range of topics, including changes that come with puberty, nutrition for adolescents, the importance of physical activity, and proper hygiene; and the creation of a pamphlet for parents teaching them how to better understand their teenage children.

 

Talking Frankly also included a competition between the schools for the healthiest and cleanest school environments. Forty-six schools from across Jordan participated in the competition, which assessed the management of health at the schools, the overall hygiene level at the schools, and the students’ understanding of health issues. The students performed skits about health subjects, including puberty, hygiene, nutrition, smoking and exercise, and prepared exhibitions on the same range of topics. An awards ceremony, held in July, celebrated the efforts of schools across Amman, Zarqa, Irbid, Ajloun, and Balqa'a.

 

In order to ensure the sustainability of the “Talking Frankly” initiative, broaden its reach, and seek continued interaction between the public and private sectors, JHCP has developed an interactive, educational website designed to help students continue to learn about their own health in a fun and enjoyable way by participating in a competition and allowing contestants with the highest results to win many prizes. Students can also continue discussion about health topics and download the informational booklets.

Development Issues: 

Children, Youth, Health.

Key Points: 

Quotes from three female student-participants in Talking Frankly include thanking the initiative for giving them "this opportunity to understand more about my body and the physical changes I am passing through", "the chance to respect the way I look and to deal with my body properly", and "the chance to learn on how and what I should do to keep my personal hygiene."

Partner Text: 

With funding from USAID: the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHUCCP), the Ministries of Education and Health, Fine Hygienic Paper Company, and Fine Sancella Hygiene Jordan.

Source: 

JHUCCP website, October 24 2011.

Happy Dampatti (Happy Couple)

"Talking openly about family planning is not usual behavior for people residing in slums of Agra, India..."

Communication Strategies: 

Going door-to-door, UHI peer educators clad in Happy Dampatti branded t-shirts reached more than 1,000 eligible couples in the intervention slums and encouraged them to participate in the contest. They communicated the fact that the 5 secrets of a "Happy Dampatti" include: spousal communication about the family's dreams, consistent use of contraceptives, immediate postpartum family planning, immediate post-abortion family planning, and male responsibility in planning for the future. Their promotion effort was aided by announcements from branded rickshaws and rickshaw microphone announcements, stilt walkers, wall paintings, posters and banners, radio promo spots, text messages (SMSs) sent to over 2000 mobile phone users with the contest signature jingle set as the ringtone on the cell phones of all staff.

 

Also included in the effort are "enrollment camps". The programme seeks to engage the community and draw people out of their homes for counselling on family planning and referrals to service, so couples had to visit the colourful Happy Dampatti enrollment camps to officially enroll in the contest. At these camps, trained staff counselled couples on family planning, assisting with choosing a method and promoting inter-spousal dialogue. Couples were referred to family planning services at local facilities. Staff also sold socially-marketed contraceptives. Over 3 days, more than 150 couples were counselled, over 100 packets of condoms were sold and more than 100 referrals were made for intrauterine devices (IUDs).

 

Happy Dampattis were selected through a range of activities, including games, a contraceptive quiz, personal family planning stories, and role plays. For example, existing successful contraceptive users recorded their stories about accepting family planning and overcoming barriers on video. These videos were judged by an independent jury who selected 12 finalists. At the Happy Dampatti main event on December 26, 5 overall winners were chosen through games and competitions, which were attended by over 3,000 people, as well as by senior government officials, public and private health care providers and the media. The event was telecast on two local television networks. The No. 1 Happy Dampatti was announced, but all of the couples were celebrated through local media (billboards, in the press, and on radio and television) channels as exemplary models for the use of family planning.

 

After the above-described pilot run of the contest, UHI scaled up the project in the city of Aligarh. Three Happy Dampatti contests were held in Aligarh slums during June 2011, with 4 more contests scheduled in other Aligarh locations starting in September 2011.

 

Click here to listen to the campaign song and to access other materials, including videos.

Development Issues: 

Family Planning.

Key Points: 

JHUCCP estimates that over 210,000 people were reached through the contests directly and an additional million people were reached through related mass media.

 

The UHI, a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation-funded 5-year endeavour, works to promote family planning in India and 3 other countries by increasing uptake of birth control and delaying and spacing methods and by promoting modern methods of contraception through the use of role models, mobile health applications, and entertainment education.

Contact Information: 
See video
Source: 

JHUCCP website, October 24 2011.

Democracia Activa - Peru (DAP)

Democracia Activa

The Democracia Activa - Peru programme (DAP), with technical input from C-Change, applies social and behaviour change communication (SBCC) principles to increase Peruvians' trust and comfort in democratic participation. DAP works with local partners to implement a targeted communication campaign that combines creative messaging, social mobilisation, and electronic networking to increase citizen participation in democratic processes and instil trust in democratic systems and institutions.

Communication Strategies: 

Prior to local/regional and national elections in 2010-11, the programme worked to focus voters' attention on key policy issues by disseminating information on local, regional, and national issues. DAP helped the Government of Peru design its Voto Informado (Informed Vote) campaign which, as of March 2011, was supported by: Twitter, Facebook, RSS feeds, and YouTube. To strengthen its social mobilisation and web-based efforts, DAP launched media interventions - Se Buscan Peruanos que no se Dejen Mecer (Wanted: Peruvians Who Don’t Give Up) and Agua que Hace Decir la Verdad (Water that Makes You Tell the Truth) - through a variety of channels (print materials, online videos, radio spots, and a web platform) to generate enthusiasm to focus on the primary objective of increased democratic participation. DAP also launched an automated phone system that allows callers to compare candidates.

 

One of DAP's strategies is in-person events that use an entertainment-education strategy. From March 24 to April 3 2011, DAP was part of a citizen fair initiative in Junin, Peru, the goal of which was to encourage citizens, especially youth, to cast informed votes in the April 11 national election and hold politicians accountable. Activities included: seminars on democracy and elections; live televised debates by congressional candidates; and information kiosks in plazas, university campuses, and other busy locations. With assistance from local implementing partners, citizen fairs were held, where hundreds received information in the course of enjoying games and other entertainment. According to organisers, "[i]nformation and excitement spread at a musical festival in Arequipa, parades in Ayacucho and Junín, cultural festivals in Cusco and Junín, and a democracy party in San Martín."

 

The DAP website invites citizens to ask questions, get involved, connect with each other, and spread the word about democracy in their communities through an engaging online platform. Through the website, forums, and a blog, the online platform is designed to help DAP build a nationwide network of advocates and representatives that carry the programme's messages throughout the country.

Development Issues: 

Democracy and Governance.

Partner Text: 

C-Change, FHI360.

Contact Information: 
Source: 

Email from Sarah Meyanathan to The Communication Initiative on September 9 2011; and C-Change website, July 31 2012.

NetWorks

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The NetWorks programme, running from 2009 to 2014, is working to prevent malaria in Nigeria, Senegal, and Uganda by increasing access to long lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and promoting consistent use.

Communication Strategies: 

Key components of the NetWorks programme include an initial analysis of the country context, stakeholder coordination, policy refinement, strengthened distribution networks, demand creation and promotion, and monitoring and evaluation. These components are designed to mutually reinforce each other and create a sustainable system for ensuring increased access and use of LLINs at the household level. Strategies differ between countries, but overall there are three key strategic programme areas:

Net Distribution

According to Networks, the programme strongly supports a mixed-methods approach to LLIN distribution, dependent on local circumstances and the country context. A strategy may include a combination of mass distribution to scale up rapidly to universal coverage coupled with a continuous distribution system to sustain high coverage. In most cases, a mix of public sector distribution via health facilities for pregnant women and young children, combined with some form of civil society partnership for increased community-wide access is preferred for long-term sustained access. NetWorks is helping to identify clear roles for public and non-public sector partners such as the private sector and faith-based organisations (FBOs). NetWorks partners provide training where needed to break bottlenecks, strengthen supply chains and community reporting mechanisms for improved management monitoring, and identify subsidy opportunities for expanded private sector roles where appropriate.

Behaviour Change Communication (BCC)

NetWorks is working to strengthen demand creation using behaviour change communication to close the gap between ownership and use. This includes producing and disseminating mass media messages on LLIN use. For example, in Senegal, NetWorks is leading BCC activities for the universal coverage distribution; training and providing job aids to UC volunteers; producing and disseminating radio and television spots on LLIN use; and developing a net care and repair toolkit. This includes using community radio and local celebrities as a central medium for communicating messages. NetWorks is also conducting research on the impact of BCC and BCC programmes in the key countries, as well as facilitating consultations. In February 2011, NetWorks facilitated an expert consultation meeting for Roll Back Malaria to examine ways that the malaria BCC community can ensure high quality BCC activities are well-described in countries' global fund applications, documented in a brief note on the impact and contribution of BCC to malaria control with best practices for developing strategic BCC and a set of sample indicators.

Research, Policy, and Advocacy

NetWorks is establishing a regular process of evaluating results and implementation strategies to feed new information into decision-making via regular review process, coordinated dissemination of results, and use of results in advocacy. According to Networks, national decision-makers need credible information and a supportive advocacy environment in order to establish policies for effective distribution and use. For example, the NetWorks project has collaborated on the design and implementation of mass and continuous distribution systems, and with the National Malaria Control Programme in Nigeria on post-campaign evaluations that build the evidence base around integrated and stand-alone campaigns. In Tanzania, NetWorks is conducting formative research in Kagera and Zanzibar on messaging to encourage community members to use nets in the context of reduced malaria transmission settings.

The NetWorks website provides updates about the programme, as well as materials for download.

Development Issues: 

Malaria

Key Points: 

In Senegal, The NetWorks project, in partnership with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), PMI and other partners, has successfully achieved Universal Coverage in six regions of Senegal. A total of 1,362,141 nets were distributed between June 2010 and April 2011. Mass distribution will continue in two additional regions, Diourbel and Fatick, between April and June 2011, delivering 1,360,000 nets. The next phases will continue until every household at risk in Senegal has a net to cover every sleeping space.

Partner Text: 

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Communication Programs (JHUCCP), Malaria Consortium, Catholic Relief Services, Mennonite Economic Development Association (MEDA), London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), International Procurement Agency (IPA), and the United States Agency for International Development

Source: 

NetWorks website and JHUCCP website on September 20 2011.

Esquadrão da Prevenção (Prevention Squad)

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Esquadrão da Prevenção (Prevention Squad) is a multimedia campaign that features cartoon superheroes on television and radio, in print materials, and in person, who protect children from malaria and water-borne illness. Launched in 2010 by Population Services International (PSI) Angola, the campaign is designed to raise awareness about malaria and water-borne illness prevention among children by encouraging parents to more consistently follow healthy practices with their children, such as using bed nets, treating water, and washing hands with soap.

Communication Strategies: 

The characters appear on television, on the radio, as live action superheroes (played by actors), as well as in posters and comic books. Each member of the superhero team has a different superpower they use to fight childhood illness.

  • Comandante Seguro e Salvo is faster than the speed of light and has a magic arm band that discharges the mosquito net, Seguro e Salvo, just in the nick of time to cover children's beds before they go to sleep.
  • Capitã Certeza has an enchanted belt with bottles of the water treatment, Certeza, which makes water safe to drink.
  • Tenente Sabonete plays with soap bubbles and clean water to encourage children to wash their hands with soap.
  • Doutor Maguxi is the inventor behind the heroes and makes sure they arrive on time to prevent children from getting sick. He also makes sure that if prevention fails for some reason, treatment is provided at health centres.

According to organisers, the cartoon characters have already reached the hearts of children, who are "playing" the superhero roles and telling their mothers they can't drink the water because Capitã Certeza hasn't made it clean. Organisers hope that through the influence of children, parents will learn about protecting their children from malaria and water-borne illness.

Development Issues: 

Malaria, Water-borne illness, Children

Key Points: 

According to PSI, qualitative studies in Angola have looked in-depth at behavioural determinants for using a mosquito net to prevent malaria and for treating water to prevent water-borne illnesses. Results from both studies indicate that mothers know the importance of both of these behaviours when it comes to the health of their children; however, they are not consistent in either net use or water treatment. To influence these practices in order to change these important behaviours with mothers, PSI/Angola is using children as an entry point to get the message across.

Partner Text: 

Population Services International (PSI)

Source: 

PSI website on August 31 2011.

Malaria NightWatch

Malaria NightWatch

NightWatch, launched in September 2010 by Lalela Project and Malaria No More, centres on nightly reminders to sleep under a mosquito net, broadcast though 30-second radio and television spots featuring celebrities, as well as through SMSs (text messages). The reminders are broadcast at 9pm, the hour before malaria-carrying mosquitoes come out. The media campaign is complemented by grassroots initiatives, billboards, launch events, and media advocacy to re-inforce the messages.

Communication Strategies: 

The programme was designed around the idea of "taking back the night" to create positive behavioural changes to increase mosquito net usage. In the evenings, just before the malaria-carrying mosquito comes out, organisers broadcast messages by leaders and celebrities via radio, television, and SMS to emphasise the need to consistently use bed nets. The 30-second messages provide information about malaria and ask families: "It's nine pm...are you and your family safe under your mosquito nets tonight?" The programme is similar to the American public service announcement (PSA) of the 1980s that asked parents to check on their children: "It's ten pm...do you know where your children are?"

Each country-based campaign is designed to complement on-going bed net distributions and the technical work of the government and other health partners. For example, the programme launched in Cameroon alongside the distribution of 8.7 million mosquito nets and according to Malaria No More, will do the same in Chad where 3.3 million nets are planned for distribution in 2012. By coupling NightWatch with national bed net campaigns, the campaign seeks to leverage massive investments in malaria control to make those resources more effective and national campaigns more efficient.

The strategy also includes producing creative content which is strategically designed to resonate with local populations. To ensure that NightWatch messages are relevant and effective, Malaria No More conducts research on knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours around malaria and the cultural landscape in each country. Every country is different and nationally representative surveys address everything from the appropriate message tone and knowledge gaps, to who the most trusted spokespeople are and what the most popular communications medium is. These findings, combined with the Ministry of Health’s official messaging, guide message content. Content is refreshed as net distributions enter a new phase and studies are conducted annually to measure NightWatch’s reach and behaviour change impact.

The reach and impact of the mass media campaign is further complemented by launch concerts, national malaria anthems, wall calendars or billboards featuring the messages, brand, and spokespeople of the campaign. The campaign is further reinforced by a three-step school-based curriculum designed for youth aged 12-14. First, there is a "rite of passage" where every student passes a nine-point test about malaria and net usage. Then students receive a certificate of accomplishment and pledge to use their nets. Finally, in the "dream keeper" activity, students identify their dreams and goals for the future, and draw these dreams on a dream banner. The students keep their dream banner under their mosquito nets as a reminder to keep themselves and their dreams alive.

Along with encouraging malaria behavior change, the campaign seeks to encourage public demand for malaria prevention tools and government accountability. By creating a highly visible mass media platform, NightWatch also aims to mobilise funding and engage new leadership in malaria and attract non-traditional players across the entertainment, public, and private sectors to the malaria fight.

Cultural icons who have committed to the programme include: Youssou NDour; Akon; Viviane (musicians, Senegal); BabyFace; R. Kelly; Ludacris; 50 Cent; Usher (musicians, U.S.); Yvonne Chaka Chaka (musician, South Africa); Les Nubians; Richard Bona; Lady Ponce (musicians, Cameroon); Fally Ipupa (musician, DRC); Alexandre Song (footballer, Cameroon); Papis Demba Cisse; Moussa Sow (footballers, Senegal); Luc Mbah a Moute (NBA Basketball, Cameroon), among others. According to Malaria No More, both celebrities and the private sector are attracted to a high-visibility platform that provides the opportunity to link their image with a positive, high-quality campaign while promoting the health of their communities.

Click here to listen to Youssou N'Dour's announcement on the Malaria No More website.

Development Issues: 

Malaria

Key Points: 

According to Malaria No More, a nationally representative survey with 2,000 participants in Senegal in July 2011 showed that 58% of respondents had been exposed to a NightWatch message, and that of those exposed 74% were able to successfully recall that the message was “sleeping under a net is important" and 72% recalled that the message aired at 9 p.m., when malaria-carrying mosquitos comes out to bite. The survey also showed that exposure to NightWatch made a person 16% more likely to know that mosquitoes are the cause of malaria and 24% more likely to know that the malaria-carrying mosquito bites at night. Children whose parents heard the messages were 8% more likely to have slept under a bed net the night before.


In Senegal, 47 community radio stations were broadcasting 10 different NightWatch PSA radio spots to some of the most rural parts of Senegal. Malaria No More is also working with Peace Corps volunteers who have relations with local radio stations to franchise the NightWatch platform and spread it virally.

Partner Text: 

Lalela Project, Malaria No More, ExxonMobil, Cotco, MTN Cameroon, Tigo Senegal

Contact Information: 
See video
Source: 

Lalela website and Malaria No More website on July 2 2011 and March 6 2012, and email from Trish Delude on March 2 2012.

GoodLife Campaign

GoodLife Campaign

Launched in November 2010, the GoodLife campaign in Ghana is a multimedia campaign designed to encourage reflection about what makes life "good," linking personal happiness to the practice of health behaviours. According to organisers, it is designed to move health messages beyond instructive commands to engaging people on issues relevant to their own daily lives, using music, television, and print materials.

Communication Strategies: 

The campaign includes a theme song recorded by the GoodLife Allstars, a group of young Ghanaian musicians chosen from a large pool of both well-known and new artists who submitted tracks for the song. A music video was also made for the song, which features the artists singing to and about people making positive life choices. According to organisers, the song has had a strong, positive response, and has gained popularity on both television networks and radio stations. Organisers are currently working to make the song available as a ring tone. The song will also be featured as the theme music for the GoodLife Gameshow.

In addition to the music video, a number of television spots have also been developed featuring ordinary people talking about their Good Life, and making positive decisions about their health. A short documentary was also produced as a "teaser" prior to the actual launch of the campaign. The documentary features teams of "GoodLife Community Stormers" in various cities asking people on the street what their Good Life is.

The campaign also includes print materials, including posters, a quiz, and a bumper sticker.

Click here to visit the BCS Project's Youtube channel and to watch the television spots and "teaser" documentary.

Click here to view and download print materials including posters, fliers, and stickers, as well as the GoodLife song in Mp3 format.

Development Issues: 

Family Planning, Maternal Health

Key Points: 

The Ghana BCS Project is a 4-year USAID-supported project managed by the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs with CARE and PLAN International in partnership with the Ministry of Health and the Ghana Health Service (GHS). The overall purpose of the project is to assist the GHS at the national, regional, and district levels to support its efforts to achieve health-related millennium development goals through sustained and coherent social and behaviour change communication (BCC) interventions. BCS aims to increase demand and use of commodities and services and create positive behaviours in the areas of:

  • maternal neonatal and child health;
  • family planning;
  • malaria prevention and treatment;
  • nutrition; and
  • water, sanitation, and hygiene.

The BCS project is audience-focused and driven by the community and family level, where behaviour and norms are formed. The primary focus is on households with children and youth and the communities they live in, the providers they go to, and the district and national leaders that impact them. The project employs the Communication for Social Change model. This aims to blend community, interpersonal, and mass media approaches, building synergy around three strategic elements or engines.

Partner Text: 

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Center for Communication Programs, United States Agency for International Development (USAID), CARE, PLAN International, Ministry of Health, Ghana Health Service (GHS).

See video
Source: 

JHUCCP website on June 12 2011

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