Date: 
March 10, 2014

The Drum BeatThe Drum Beat - 659 - Media to Empower and Advocate for Health

section_separator
This issue focuses on:
EMPOWERMENT STRATEGIES: HEALTH RIGHTS OF THE MARGINALISED
FILM FOR ADVOCACY AND IMPACT
FOCUS ON: MENTAL HEALTH COMMUNICATION
COMMUNICATION RESOURCES FOR HEALTH & RIGHTS PRACTITIONERS
section_separator
This issue of The Drum Beat highlights recent selections from The CI's Health, Rights, Media theme site, which is supported by the Health Media Initiative of the Open Society Public Health Program. This programme is committed to advancing health and human rights with a focus on social inclusion, transparency, accountability, and participatory decision-making. It works to strengthen the capacity of marginalised populations.

In that spirit, this dedicated area on The CI site gathers knowledge, insight, experience, and resources from people addressing health issues from a rights perspective using media-based strategies at local, national, and international levels. These initiatives (some supported by the Open Society Foundations - OSF) provide the basis for the critical review processes and sharing of experiences that can help advance the impact and scale of media, health, and human rights action.

content_separator
From The Communication Initiative Network - where communication and media are central to social and economic development.
Please "Like": The Communication Initiative Network Facebook page
You also have the opportunity to vote "Like" on any of the pages visited from the selections below.
Please "Follow" The CI on Twitter - @warrencomminit
Subscribe to The Drum Beat
Click here to access The Drum Beat archives.
section_separator
EMPOWERMENT STRATEGIES: HEALTH RIGHTS OF THE MARGINALISED
1. Bringing Justice to Health: The Impact of Legal Empowerment Projects on Public Health
This report profiles 11 legal empowerment projects based in Indonesia, Kenya, Macedonia, Russia, South Africa, and Uganda, telling personal stories of people - such as sex workers, people who use drugs, palliative care patients, people affected by HIV, and Roma - for whom human rights violations are part of everyday life. For example, from Survivors Self Help Group, Kenya: "Recognizing the importance of working closely with local businesses and the police force, Survivors initiated a series of workshops in which paralegals educated the community about the concerns of sex workers and the relevance of human rights law to sex work....After some initial backlash, Survivors noted an improvement in relations between sex workers and law enforcement authorities, and police officers began offering their mobile phone numbers so that sex workers could contact them directly when problems arose with their clients." [OSF, Sep 2013]
content_separator
2. Advancing Human Rights in Patient Care through Higher Education in Eastern Europe and Central Asia
by Tamar Ezer and Judy Overall
"Meaningful engagement with health practitioners has entailed connections to day-to-day practice, participatory methodology, inclusion of marginalized voices, and linkages to provider rights and challenges." OSF has attempted to respond to the need to build health and human rights capacity by supporting the development of over 25 courses on human rights in patient care in 9 countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA). This paper describes the communication strategies and activities carried out as part of this initiative to advance the human rights of society's most marginalised people for whom "health systems can too often be places of punishment, coercion, and violations of basic rights to privacy and confidentiality, rather than places of treatment and care." [OSF, Dec 2013]
content_separator
3. Access to Justice: Evaluating Law, Health and Human Rights Programmes in Kenya
by Sofia Gruskin, Kelly Safreed-Harmon, Tamar Ezer, Anne Gathumbi, Jonathan Cohen, and Patricia Kameri-Mbote
Legal integration programmes, defined here as programmes incorporating legal aid, training, and representation into existing health services to improve health outcomes and advance human rights, have the potential to promote accountability, reduce stigma and discrimination, and contribute to altering unjust structures and systems. The impetus for this evaluation of the impact of legal empowerment programmes was the observation that it is not yet clear how legal support can best be integrated into health services, within and beyond the field of HIV. This article presents findings from an evaluation of 3 OSF-funded legal integration programmes, all administered by Kenyan non-governmental organisations (NGOs). [OSF, Nov 2013]
content_separator
4. HIV and the Law: Seven Fact Sheets
This series of fact sheets offers information and language that may be useful for advocacy, campaigning, and lobbying on the part of civil society groups, particularly those working with populations at high risk of HIV. One tip provided here relates to gathering evidence that transgender rights are a public health issue: "Community-Based Participatory Research is a methodology particularly well-suited to gathering information from, and collaborating effectively with, key populations to build an evidence base…for generating the support needed to change laws and administrative practices." [OSF, Oct 2013]
content_separator
5. UNDP Discussion Paper: Transgender Health & Human Rights
by Jack Byrne
This discussion paper aims to increase understanding of the human rights issues that trans people (a term used here to include all people whose sense of their gender identity differs from the sex they were assigned at birth) face and the priority actions required to secure their right to dignity, equality, health, and security. Through action points, the paper suggests practical ways that United Nations (UN) staff, trans advocates, human rights defenders, and policymakers can employ to be more inclusive of trans people. Examples include: build capacity on trans human rights, conduct sensitivity training on gender identity issues (ideally developed in partnership with local trans communities), hold trans-specific consultations, and facilitate dialogue between trans groups and government agencies. [United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Dec 2013]
content_separator
6. Women's Legal Centre (WLC)
Based in Cape Town, South Africa, WLC is a non-profit, independent law centre that seeks to achieve equality for women in South Africa. For example, in collaboration with sex worker organisations, WLC began by offering weekly group workshops on human rights to sex workers and then expanded its work, employing 4 former and current sex workers as paralegals. The benefits of peer-based legal assistance are clear, says a paralegal named Ncumisa. "We know the industry. It is easy to communicate freely without fear of being stigmatized since we share similar experiences in their line of duty."
content_separator
7. Cops & Rubbers
This interactive board game for health and human rights advocates, health practitioners, academics, and policymakers demonstrates the real consequences of policing tactics for sex workers, including increased vulnerability to HIV infection. [OSF Public Health Program]
content_separator
See also:
content_separator
[top]
section_separator
FILM FOR ADVOCACY AND IMPACT
8. Fire in the Blood
Filmed across 4 continents, this documentary - meant to be a conversation-starter - "tells the story of how Western pharmaceutical companies and governments blocked access to low-cost AIDS drugs for the countries of the global south in the years after 1996 - causing ten million or more unnecessary deaths - and the improbable group of people who decided to fight back." Fire in the Blood describes the strategies of the coalition that came together to fight for access to life-saving medicine.
content_separator
9. Social Justice Documentary: Designing for Impact
by Jessica Clark and Barbara Abrash
This working paper examines methodologies for strategic design and evaluation of social issue documentary films. It offers a framework for planning and evaluating the impact of these films - a framework that encompasses planning, circulation, engagement, and mobilisation - in a networked media environment. The report's recommendations are informed by lessons from 6 case studies, including "A Lion in the House", which addresses health care inequity through the lens of childhood cancer. Strategies included: engaging stakeholders (from national organisations to local and regional service providers) early on; creating links among these groups; and producing training modules for healthcare providers. [Sep 2011]
content_separator
10. Real Films, Real Impact
"...[D]ocumentaries are increasingly being recognised as a key medium for communicating social justice issues and inspiring social change....But there is widespread lack of understanding about how the social impact of such media should be monitored and reported and a lack of templates and tools to assist them." Combining narrative, data, and observations from a committee of peers assembled to judge the films, the 5 case studies provide accounts of makers and advocates working together to make change. They offer a framework for other makers and funders seeking to evaluate media impact. [The BRITDOC Foundation, Dec 2013]
content_separator
11. Free-Range Thinking
by Andy Goodman
This is a monthly journal of best practices and resources for public interest communicators, designed to help them reach more people more effectively. For instance, one item in the September 2013 edition reports on a University of Southern California (USC), United States, study showing that health messages can have more impact when they come wrapped in a story. The USC team created two 11-minute films featuring Mexican-Americans that contained the same 10 facts regarding cervical cancer's cause, prevention, and treatment. To test response to the films, half of a focus group of women then viewed the narrative film, while the other half watched the non-narrative film. The narrative was more effective in producing the desired behaviour: getting or scheduling a Pap test.
content_separator
See also:
content_separator
[top]
section_separator
FOCUS ON: MENTAL HEALTH COMMUNICATION
12. Increasing the Priority of Mental Health in Africa: Findings from Qualitative Research in Ghana, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia
by Philippa Bird, Maye Omar, Victor Doku, Crick Lund, James Rogers Nsereko, Jason Mwanza, and the MHaPP Research Programme Consortium
According to this Mental Health and Poverty Project (MHaPP) research, despite the high prevalence of mental illness, mental health remains a low priority in Africa. Noting that there has been no investigation of the views of stakeholders in Africa on why this is and what can be done, researchers undertook a comparison of the views of stakeholders in Ghana, South Africa, Uganda, and Zambia. "Our findings have indicated the importance of international information and advocacy in providing support for mental health, taking into account the information needs and social, cultural and political context. We also provide concrete evidence-based recommendations in response to calls for mental health advocacy to be informed by research on political will..." [Sep 2011]
content_separator
13. Mind-Rights Film Festival (MRFF)
This film festival (November 6-7 2014, Lisbon, Portugal) aims to spread knowledge on mental illness, raise public awareness on this topic, encourage social inclusion of people with mental disabilities, and fight stigmatisation. Therefore, the award ceremony will be not just a celebration of the creativity of filmmakers, but also a recognition of their commitment to human rights issues. (Filmmaker deadline submission date: June 30 2014) [Gulbenkian Global Mental Health Platform and the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation]
content_separator
14. Actipedia
This open-access, user-generated database is meant to be a place to share, read about, and comment upon experiences and examples of how activists and artists are using creative tactics and strategies to challenge power and offer visions of a better society. For example, one can read about the work of an artistic activist whose project is dedicated to improving mental health care and inspiring people to care for their mental health.
content_separator
See also:
content_separator
[top]
section_separator
COMMUNICATION RESOURCES FOR HEALTH & RIGHTS PRACTITIONERS
15. Vision, Values, and Voice: A Communications Toolkit
Integrating "social justice superhero Helvetika Bold", this practical toolkit offers social justice advocates tips and ideas to "unleash their communications superpowers", including guidance on forming a communications strategy, framing and messaging, and media outreach. In addition to big-picture thinking about communication strategies, readers will also find examples of a range of tactics, as well as concrete messaging guidance in the form of detachable "Opportunity Flashcards".
content_separator
16. Mapping Your Online Media Strategies: A Guide for Nonprofits
This ebook provides a practical guide to nonprofit organisations, particularly those in South Africa, wanting to choose social media platforms and develop an effective online media strategy. One example relates to the use of the tool Mxit (a free instant messaging application developed for cellphones) by Cell Life, a Cape Town, South Africa-based nonprofit that has made counselling services and health information accessible to South African youth infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. Through the "Mxit cares" platform, Cell Life's trained counsellors engage in confidential chats with youth in need. [Nonprofit Network, Nov 2013]
content_separator
17. Why Bad Presentations Happen to Good Causes (and How to Ensure They Won't Happen to Yours)
by Andy Goodman
Based on quantitative and qualitative research with over 2,500 public interest professionals, as well as interviews and a literature review, this resource offers guidance to representatives of NGOs who are making presentations. For example, the author suggests this strategy: "When I talk to audiences about storytelling, I always remind them that telling stories is not enough to make your case. Stories are a terrific way to bring large issues down to ground level where people can get their minds (and hearts) around them. But after you have told your story, you must back it up with the numbers that prove you have more than one story to tell." [Jan 2006]
content_separator
See also:
content_separator
[top]
section_separator
See also:
content_separator
[top]
section_separator
This issue of The Drum Beat was written by Kier Olsen DeVries.
section_separator
The Drum Beat is the email and web network of The Communication Initiative Partnership - Partners: ANDI, BBC Media Action, Bernard van Leer Foundation, Breakthrough, Calandria, Citurna TV, DFID, Eldis, FAO, Fundación Imaginario, Fundación Nuevo Periodismo, Heartlines, Iberoamericano (FNPI), IFPRI, Inter-American Development Bank, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Communication Programs, MISA, Open Society Foundations, Oxfam Novib, PAHO, The Panos Institute, Puntos de Encuentro, The Rockefeller Foundation, SAfAIDS, Sesame Workshop, Soul City, STEPS International, UNAIDS, UNDP, UNFPA, UNICEF, USAID, The Wellcome Trust, World Health Organization (WHO), W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

The Drum Beat seeks to cover the full range of communication for development activities. Inclusion of an item does not imply endorsement or support by The Partners.

Chair of the Partners Group: Garth Japhet, Founder, Soul City garth@heartlines.org.za

Executive Director: Warren Feek wfeek@comminit.com

content_separator
The Editor of The Drum Beat is Kier Olsen DeVries.
Please send additional project, evaluation, strategic thinking, and materials information on communication for development at any time. Send to drumbeat@comminit.com

The Drum Beat seeks to cover the full range of communication for development activities. Inclusion of an item does not imply endorsement or support by The Partners.

To reproduce any portion of The Drum Beat, click here for our policy.

To subscribe, click here.

To unsubscribe, please send an email to drumbeat@comminit.com with "Unsubscribe" in the subject line.

section_separator