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Gugar Goge ("Tell me Straight")

In 2006, the United States (US)-based Population Media Center (PMC) produced a 70-episode radio serial drama project in northern Nigeria with the aim of improving maternal health and preventing obstet
Communication Strategies: 

According to PMC, the programme aims to raise awareness and encourage behaviour change by modeling behaviour that will prevent obstetric fistula, reduce stigma, and encourage fistula victims to seek help for the treatable problem. Obstetric fistula is a condition commonly resulting from adolescent childbirth that makes its victims chronically incontinent. The programme was created in Hausa, the most widely spoken language in northern Nigeria and neighbouring countries, and was aired in Kano and Kaduna states. on Radio Nigeria-Hausa Service and FM 96.5. Click here to listen to a selection of the episodes online.

According to PMC, entertainment-education is at the heart of all of its work, including this programme. This methodology involves creating serial soap operas that are customised for the needs and circumstances of specific regions. Organisers believe that the concept of social learning means that humans adopt many of their values and learn much of their behaviour from role models. Long-running serial dramas contain plots and sub-plots that unfold over many months, with "good" and "bad" role models through whom audience members can gradually learn the consequences of decisions they may make.

PMC uses what they call the Whole Society Strategy, which is a technique that combines audience research with as many channels of communication as possible in order to reach an entire society with messages and role models that promote positive behaviour.

Development Issues: 

Health, Reproductive Health, Women.

Key Points: 

In order to evaluate the effects of the serial drama, PMC partnered with Planned Parenthood Federation of Nigeria to conduct a preliminary monitoring report based on client exit interviews at three clinics, one hospital, and one basic health post in Kano and Kaduna states. The purpose of the study was to assess the effects of the serial drama on demand for reproductive health services. By mid-September of 2006, 47% of new reproductive health clients indicated they were listening to the programme. Clinic monitoring data indicated that "Gugar Goge" served as the primary motivation to seek health care services for 33% of family planning/reproductive health clients and 54% of fistula clients.

PMC is an international nonprofit organisation with headquarters in Shelburne, Vermont, US. The organisation uses entertainment broadcasting to change cultural attitudes and individual behaviour with regard to health and social issues in various developing countries. "PMC has completed projects in Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ivory Coast, Mali, Niger, the Philippines, and Sudan with very impressive results and currently has programmes either broadcasting or developing in Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Honduras, Kenya, Madagascar, Morocco, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, Brazil, Jamaica, Mexico, China, Vietnam and the US."

Partner Text: 

PMC, RFPD, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, and the Conservation, Food and Health Foundation.

Source: 

PMC Nigeria website on February 6 2007 and September 5 2008; and RFPD website on September 5 2008.

Fight Fistula! Campaign

Communication Strategies: 

As the campaign is based on the idea that prevention is the key to fighting fistula, the campaign's main strategies are to promote awareness of fistula and improve family planning services. The organisers believe that peer-to-peer communication, supported by the provision of good health services, can be an effective way to encourage young women to take control of their sexual and reproductive health, thereby preventing incidences of fistula.

The campaign uses peer education as a means to engage young people and trains former fistula sufferers to conduct home visits and raise awareness about reproductive health issues through youth clubs. At the same time, the training of former fistula patients aims to assist in their reintegration, help reduce stigma by normalising the condition, and give other members of the youth clubs the opportunity to talk openly with someone who understands their concerns and experiences.

As part of the project, DSW is also working to increase the organisational and management capacity of 15 youth clubs that focus on young women. This includes establishing a referral system between youth clubs and health facilities to help improve access to reproductive health services. Local nurses, who have been trained on the treatment of fistula, liaise with the youth clubs, provide counselling services, and educate the community (notably, parents and religious leaders) about topics linked to the prevention and treatment of fistula.

Through the mass edutainment aspect of the campaign, the project aims to engage a more diverse and wider audience than can be reached through the youth clubs. According to the organisers, the youth clubs are using folk media methods - including music, dance, and drama - to promote social values, raise awareness, disseminate information, provide role models, and encourage positive attitudes and behaviour change.

Development Issues: 

Women, Reproductive Health, Maternal Health, Youth.

Key Points: 

Fistula is a childbirth injury that can leave women incontinent, ashamed, and ostracised from society. An obstetric fistula is a hole, caused by prolonged obstructed labour, leading to damages to the tissues of the vagina, the bladder, and rectum. Apart from leaving women incontinent, women may also suffer nerve damage to lower extremities after prolonged labour in a squatting position and significant emotional damage from both the death of the baby, which happens in most cases, and the stigma that accompanies fistula.

DSW says that in Ethiopia alone there are an estimated 100,000 women suffering with untreated fistula, either due to lack of awareness or shame derived from social stigma. Each year, another 9,000 women develop fistula, representing the highest prevalence of fistula worldwide. Fistula occurs disproportionately among impoverished girls and women, especially those living far from medical services. The Fight Fistula! campaign aims to reach an estimated half a million people in the region.

Partner Text: 

Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital and DSW.

Contact Information: 
Source: 

Youth to Youth website; DSW Fast Facts [PDF] on May 6 2008; and email from Tirsit Grishaw to The Communication Initiative on November 6 2009.

Deliver Now for Women and Children

Communication Strategies: 

Deliver Now draws upon partnership and the participation of prominent personnel to communicate the fact that health services related to children's and women's health are available for all - with prompt access and without discrimination.

For example, the New York City (in New York, the United States) launch took place amidst rallies in Manhattan and the Bronx; awareness-raising events across the city to build popular support for the drive throughout the week. The launch was scheduled to coincide with the convening of a panel at the United Nations, "Saving 77 Million Lives", featuring female UN leaders and global health activists discussing the critical issues facing women and children around the world. The launch was followed by other global events, such as the conference Women Deliver in London, the United Kingdom (UK), and the roll-out of local programmes in individual countries. As part of this process, Deliver Now is bringing together local government agencies, civil society, media, and other national and international members of the initiative; the results of these programmes will be monitored as part of an effort to ensure success and accountability. For instance, Deliver Now is working with local organisations to implement a programme to build political will to ensure delivery of services and raise awareness in the Indian states of Orissa and Rajasthan. Similarly, in Tanzania, Deliver Now plans to draw upon advocacy to deliver services and raise awareness in the Tanzanian districts of Geita, Monduli, Sumbawanga, Morogoro, and Babati.

A number of celebrities, such as Nicole Kidman, Ricki Lake, and Liya Kebede, are participating in and supporting the Deliver Now initiative. Visitors to the Deliver Now website may view a public service announcement (PSA) featuring Chaka Khan. There, too, they may sign a global promise to pledge that "I believe no one should ever lose a mother, a wife or a child when simple, proven, life-saving solutions exist."

Development Issues: 

Children, Women, Health.

Key Points: 

Here are some statistics, provided by Deliver Now:

  • Every year, over 10 million mothers and children die from "mostly preventable causes".
  • Every 3 seconds, a child under the age of 5 dies.
  • Four million newborns die in their first four weeks of life, 3 million of those in the first week.
  • Forty-two percent of pregnant women around the world experiencing a complication, up to 15% of which are life-threatening.
  • Twenty percent of the world's births are in India, but 25% of the world's child deaths and 20% of the world's maternal deaths occur there as well.
  • Tanzania faces "a critical shortage of qualified health workers to assist during childbirth, with 54 percent of women receiving no skilled attendance. As a result, a woman dies of pregnancy-related complications every hour of every day."
Partner Text: 

Click here to access information about the organisations taking part in The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health. Deliver Now is supported by several governments, including those in the UK, Norway, Canada, France, and Germany - as well as a number of global health and advocacy organisations.

Source: 

Email from Birgitte Jallov to The Communication Initiative on October 12 2007; and Deliver Now website.

Impact Data - Promoting Change in Reproductive Behavior in Bihar (PRACHAR)

Date: 
August 1, 2005
Methodologies: 

Fourteen key indicators were selected to measure changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour of specific demographic groups. Five methods of measurement were used:

  1. Baseline and endline surveys
  2. Project records and service statistics
  3. Longitudinal analysis of project records and service statistics
  4. Pre- and post-training tests
  5. A survey to measure the effectiveness of BCC messages


In addition to the door-to-door household survey conducted by trained change agents, Pathfinder conducted baseline and endline surveys of knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) or behaviour related to RH/FP. The baseline survey was conducted in 2002, and the endline in 2004. As part of the endline evaluation, PRACHAR conducted a survey on the effectiveness of its communication strategies; 311 respondents were surveyed, across various demographic groups, and across all three intervention districts. Surveys were carried out in a representative sample of intervention villages, as well as in one non-intervention control area of Nalanda District.

Access: 

The PRACHAR Project reached more than 90,000 adolescents and young adults with information on key issues in reproductive health (RH)/family planning (FP). More than 100,000 parents and other community adults received similar messages aimed at building wide social acceptance for the ideas of delaying and spacing children. In short, PRACHAR reached 95.9% of the planned beneficiaries with specific messages.

In addition, 30 local non-government organisations (NGOs) in Bihar were provided with training, supervision, and resources in an effort to help them attain new levels of capacity and sustainability, particularly in maintaining and developing programmes in RH/FP. Basic RH/FP training was provided to 1,398 traditional birth attendants (dais) and 447 rural medical practitioners (RMPs). By the end of the evaluation period, 70.1% of the populations being addressed had participated in some level of training.

The endline survey revealed that 92% of primary audience groups recalled receiving messages on all 7 key RH/FP issues promoted by the PRACHAR Project. Of all respondents, 43.5% could correctly explain all elements of the 7 issues promoted by PRACHAR.

Practices: 
  • The interval between marriage and first birth for newlyweds increased from 21.3 months to 24 months.
  • The percentage of newlyweds of all ages who use contraceptives to delay their first child more than tripled, from 5.3% to 19.9%. In newlyweds aged 17 and under, 34.4% used contraception to delay the first child.
  • The percentage of newlywed adopters who began using contraception within the first 3 months of the consummation of marriage increased from 0.1% to 20.8%. At the outset of the project, only 2% of contraceptive adopters with one child had adopted contraception within 90 days of giving birth. Thirty-six months later that figure rose to 25%. Of the 2196 women who delivered their first child during the project period, 25.3% had adopted a method of contraception within 90 days of giving birth.
  • The percentage of first-time parents who used contraception to space their second child increased from 14% to 33%.
  • The contraceptive use rate among young married women increased nearly four-fold, from 9.7% to 38.1%.
  • Median age of mother at first birth increased from 20 years to 21 years.
  • Pregnancy rates in newlyweds declined from 24.3% at the start of the intervention to a 6 month average of 21.6% in the period July to December 2004. Pregnancy rates in those who had used contraception declined to 20.1% when compared with the rate of 36.3% in those who had never used a contraceptive method.
  • Age-specific fertility rates declined by 14.3% in the age group 15 to 19 years, and by 12.8% in the age group 20-24 years.
Attitudes: 

The percentage of the population (all respondents) who believe that contraception is both necessary and safe increased from 38.3% to 80.8%. Among unmarried adolescents, this figure increased from 45.3% to 90.5%.

Between baseline and endline surveys, acceptance by adults and young people in the community that early marriage and childbearing can be injurious to the health of both mother and child increased significantly. Adult recognition of the importance of spacing later children also increased.

Other Impacts: 

Initially, as in most parts of Bihar, government auxiliary nurse midwives (ANM) did not visit the villages to provide childhood immunisation and antenatal care; only 10-15% of children in Bihar have received all childhood vaccines. To make some basic RH/FP services available, NGO partners organised monthly maternal and child health (MCH) clinics at the village level. In the early months of the project, only 20% of these clinics were attended by an ANM. Towards the end of the project, attendance increased to 50%. However, the ANMs continued to limit their services to immunisation. Antenatal and post-partum checks and FP counseling had to be carried out by the project staff of the implementation partners.

Source: 

Email from Pathfinder International to The Communication Initiative on February 15 2006; and Promoting Change in the Reproductive Behavior of Youth: Pathfinder International's PRACHAR Project, Bihar, India [PDF], by Jennifer Wilder, Rekha Masilamani & Dr. E. E. Daniel, Pathfinder International, August 2005.

MDG Text: 

Between baseline and endline surveys, acceptance by adults and young people in the community that early marriage and childbearing can be injurious to the health of both mother and child increased significantly. Adult recognition of the importance of spacing later children also increased.


  • The interval between marriage and first birth for newlyweds increased from 21.3 months to 24 months.
  • The percentage of newlyweds of all ages who use contraceptives to delay their first child more than tripled, from 5.3% to 19.9%. In newlyweds aged 17 and under, 34.4% used contraception to delay the first child.
  • The percentage of newlywed adopters who began using contraception within the first 3 months of the consummation of marriage increased from 0.1% to 20.8%. At the outset of the project, only 2% of contraceptive adopters with one child had adopted contraception within 90 days of giving birth. Thirty-six months later that figure rose to 25%. Of the 2196 women who delivered their first child during the project period, 25.3% had adopted a method of contraception within 90 days of giving birth.
  • The percentage of first-time parents who used contraception to space their second child increased from 14% to 33%.
  • The contraceptive use rate among young married women increased nearly four-fold, from 9.7% to 38.1%.
  • Median age of mother at first birth increased from 20 years to 21 years.
  • Pregnancy rates in newlyweds declined from 24.3% at the start of the intervention to a 6 month average of 21.6% in the period July to December 2004. Pregnancy rates in those who had used contraception declined to 20.1% when compared with the rate of 36.3% in those who had never used a contraceptive method.
  • Age-specific fertility rates declined by 14.3% in the age group 15 to 19 years, and by 12.8% in the age group 20-24 years.

The percentage of the population (all respondents) who believe that contraception is both
necessary and safe increased from 38.3% to 80.8%. Among unmarried adolescents, this figure increased from 45.3% to 90.5%.

Between baseline and endline surveys, acceptance by adults and young people in the community that early marriage and childbearing can be injurious to the health of both mother and child increased significantly. Adult recognition of the importance of spacing later children also increased.


  • The interval between marriage and first birth for newlyweds increased from 21.3 months to 24 months.
  • The percentage of newlyweds of all ages who use contraceptives to delay their first child more than tripled, from 5.3% to 19.9%. In newlyweds aged 17 and under, 34.4% used contraception to delay the first child.
  • The percentage of newlywed adopters who began using contraception within the first 3 months of the consummation of marriage increased from 0.1% to 20.8%. At the outset of the project, only 2% of contraceptive adopters with one child had adopted contraception within 90 days of giving birth. Thirty-six months later that figure rose to 25%. Of the 2196 women who delivered their first child during the project period, 25.3% had adopted a method of contraception within 90 days of giving birth.
  • The percentage of first-time parents who used contraception to space their second child increased from 14% to 33%.
  • The contraceptive use rate among young married women increased nearly four-fold, from 9.7% to 38.1%.
  • Median age of mother at first birth increased from 20 years to 21 years.
  • Pregnancy rates in newlyweds declined from 24.3% at the start of the intervention to a 6 month average of 21.6% in the period July to December 2004. Pregnancy rates in those who had used contraception declined to 20.1% when compared with the rate of 36.3% in those who had never used a contraceptive method.
  • Age-specific fertility rates declined by 14.3% in the age group 15 to 19 years, and by 12.8% in the age group 20-24 years.

Aunties Project

Communication Strategies: 

A baseline study conducted in 2000 by the GTZ-supported health programme in Cameroon revealed that teenage pregnancies and risky sexual behaviour were widespread and needed an appropriate public health response. It became obvious that adolescents and especially girls did not have any experienced adults to ask for information or advice. The traditional role of the aunt - to provide moral and sexual education - was no longer being practised. Thus, the idea was developed to recruit teenage mothers and to train them as "little aunties," able and willing to inform and counsel their peers in the neighbourhood and in the schools.

The programme recruits teenage mothers from all over Cameroon and trains them to give testimony of their own experiences and to give advice to other adolescents in order to help them avoid the difficulties they themselves had experienced. By testifying in front of other young people in their neighbourhoods, in youth clubs, and in schools, the Aunties aim to help their listeners understand the risks of sexual behaviour and see the advantages of prevention.

In capitalising on the experience and the commitment of teenage mothers who suffered and struggled for their own and their child's survival, the project encourages a self-help as well as a peer approach. Organisers contend that not only do the adolescents who receive this counselling and advice benefit, but the teenage mothers benefit as well. The involvement of "victims" in prevention campaigns is considered by the project as a valuable concept if handled with respect, sensibility, and responsibility. The victims become empowered by sharing their knowledge and experiences and by helping others. In addition, the Aunties are encouraged to form their own association, which they name, and for which they develop the rules of
collaboration. These associations are reportedly recognised and valued by local authorities and community members.

The project philosophy of self-help is also the reason why all the teenage mothers who participate in the programme are volunteers. They receive neither a salary nor an allowance for their activities. The strict adherence to this concept is considered one of the keys to success of the project. The trained teenage mothers have to understand that they participate for themselves, not for anybody else. The organisers believe that motivation to be an Auntie comes from the empowerment and the fact that they are being valued in the community after having been marginalised.

All teenage mothers who participate in the programme take part in a 3-day basic training. The training aims to give the teenage mothers basic knowledge and skills in sexual and reproductive health, as well as the skills for speaking in public and encouraging a vision of a local self-help group. The Ministry of Health and the Ministry for Women's Empowerment supported the training sessions by sending trainers. The training programme gradually developed in a participatory manner as project staff, trainers, and trained teenage mothers regularly discussed progress and improved the training programme accordingly.

The steps to the programme include:

  • Situation analysis or baseline study
  • Mobilisation
  • Training
  • Building local associations and agreement on rules and regulations
  • Activities in schools and the neighbourhood, and individual youth counselling
  • Public relations (PR) activities in print media and on the radio and television
  • Follow-up, monitoring, and evaluation of the ongoing programme
  • The necessary support structure and budget
Development Issues: 

Reproductive Health, Youth, Gender.

Key Points: 

Formerly, aunts took care of the sexual education of young girls in different communities in Cameroon. Due to urbanisation and economic problems, families have separated, thereby putting a distance between aunts and their nieces. Organisers explain that, since parents often find it difficult to discuss sexual matters openly with their children, adolescents today receive no guidance on sexual matters. The pilot experience described above was designed to bridge the gap by reconstructing the personage of the aunt in order to guide youth. They are called "aunties", which is a diminutive of the aunt, because the project wants to reconstruct symbolically and affectionately the image of the aunt.

"The outcome of the programme was that the activity of the young mothers led to a change in attitude and behaviour in adolescents in their neighbourhoods and in their communities. The programme also empowered the teenage mothers to gained self-confidence, self-respect and the courage to make a change in their lives. Those who were marginalised in their families and communities, those who were at risk of making a living as prostitutes due to lack of other support, become successful change agents."

Partner Text: 

Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) and InWEnt.

Contact Information: 
Source: 

"Trust in Aunties" [PDF], GTZ, April 2006; and GTZ website.

VOICES for a Malaria-Free Future

Communication Strategies: 

Partnership is a key strategy in this effort to increase malaria awareness on the part of as many groups as possible and to help facilitate close collaboration and coordination - thereby raising the volume on the need for more malaria funding and effective policy. CCP and its own partners work to build and sustain relationships with donor country leaders, policymakers, opinion leaders, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM), multilateral funding agencies, the Roll Back Malaria Partnership (RBM), global health advocates, existing malaria stakeholders, the private sector, the faith-based community, the research and development community, and the media. Advocacy efforts bring developing country spokespersons to the global stage to help make malaria a priority for opinion leaders, policymakers, and the media. VOICES advocacy promotes proven control strategies and increased research and development by using data to identify barriers and inform strategic approaches to advocacy.

Specific tools were used at the early stages of the campaign to inform and bring these groups together for action, including press releases and networking, but have expanded into awareness raising and advocacy tools (fact sheets, technical briefs, media and press kits, etc.) and trainings (training for journalists on malaria, as well as media training for spokespeople who are championing malaria on the global stage). Country field offices develop specialised approaches aimed at strengthening their respective leaders' commitment to addressing barriers. In addition, VOICES produces and disseminates materials based on lessons learned, successes, and case studies from developing country activities to enhance ongoing advocacy efforts and encourage new malaria advocates. Click here to access the VOICES for a Malaria-Free Future website.

Development Issues: 

Malaria, Child & Maternal Health, Overseas Development Aid, Community Empowerment, Transparency.

Key Points: 

CCP contends that, with increased attention directed toward malaria under the Global Fund, Roll Back Malaria and the President's Malaria Initiative, this is an opportune time to advocate for effective use of funds - to make sure that resources that are promised reach the people for whom they are intended. Recent increases in dedicated funding are creating a wave of momentum to limit malaria's impact through insecticide-treated nets (ITNs), new combination therapies (ACTs), indoor residual spraying (IRS), intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) for pregnant women and infants, and vaccine research. According to CCP, while progress is being achieved and measured, many policymakers and opinion leaders are not fully aware of this progress. Voices for a Malaria-Free Future is an attempt to remedy that lack of knowledge, as well as to inform stakeholders about the importance of taking action to reduce policy barriers that prevent malaria control strategies from being properly implemented (an essential strategy for securing increased funding, according to CCP).

Partner Text: 

CCP, The CORE Group, The Malaria Consortium, Fleishman-Hillard, Project Management Institute
(PMI), World Bank, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), Global Health Council, Friends of the Global Fight, Malaria No More, UN [United Nations] Foundation, Groupe Pivot Santé Publique (Mali), Communication Initiatives for Change (Ghana), Kenya NGO [non-governmental organisation] Alliance against Malaria (KENAAM, Kenya), Malaria Consortium (Mozambique). Supported by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Source: 

July 27 2006 Press Release Hopkins' CCP Launches New Advocacy Program to Promote Global Action on Malaria - forwarded by Kim Martin; email from Hannah Koenker to The Communication Initiative on August 23 2006; Roll Back Malaria Partnership E-update, December 7 2006; VOICES for a Malaria-Free Future website, April 17 2009; and email from Matt Lynch to The Communication Initiative on April 21 2009 (Image credit: MHallahan/Sumitomo Chemical - Olyset® Net).

Hear Each Other

Communication Strategies: 

The materials for the "Hear Each Other!" campaign were developed using formative research that was designed to: explore the knowledge, attitudes, and practice of couples from different socio-demographic groups regarding contraceptive use; investigate gender roles in reproductive health decision making and contraceptive use; and explore the sources of information couples in different social groups use when making decisions about family planning and contraceptive use. Sixteen focus groups were conducted in two Russian cities, Irkutsk and Orenburg, with 8 groups in each city.

Based on the insights from the focus group process, various communication materials were developed - drawing centrally on a humourous and positive approach which was found to be understandable and attractive to this audience. Posters and stickers - featuring images of cartoon-character men and women with tag-lines such as "Each day of being silent can cost a lot" - were placed in medical institutions, pharmacies, movie theatres, and on public transport. Three different booklets were distributed to the intended audience; in addition, a booklet and cue card on counseling couples were developed for medical providers. Furthermore, regional TV and radio channels showed PSAs. "Hear Each Other!" materials can be viewed/downloaded by clicking here.

Development Issues: 

Reproductive Health, Gender.

Source: 

Media/Materials Clearinghouse Spotlight, July 31 2006 and June 17 2009; and email from Judy Heck to The Communication Initiative on October 6 2006.

Entre Nous Jeunes

Communication Strategies: 

The project involves mobilising peer educators to lead discussions and conduct informal interviews with fellow youth on topics related to family planning (FP) and STIs/AIDS. It also distributes educational material and sells condoms to youth.

Specifically, Entre Nous Jeunes relies on large numbers of existing, community-based, youth service clubs and youth associations (sports and religious). The programme organisers recruit youth to be volunteer peer educators and test them for motivation and commitment. Those who are selected receive training, lasting one week, in facilitating group discussions as well as in reproductive anatomy, abstinence, contraceptive methods, and skills to negotiate condom use. Every 3 months, peer educators receive additional training to reinforce their skills and knowledge and to resolve outstanding problems or concerns.

Peer educators work within their own community to educate their peers and to refer them, when necessary, to reproductive and sexual health care. Peer educators arrange discussion groups and meet with their peers in health and sports association gatherings, and one-on-one. They also distribute information, education, and communication (IEC) materials including calendars, comic strips with information about contraception and sexual health, and posters. Peer educators receive reimbursement for travel expenses as well as promotional materials, including tee shirts, shorts, baseball caps, bags, and calendars.

Development Issues: 

Sexual and Reproductive Health, HIV/AIDS, Youth.

Key Points: 

Entre Nous Jeunes is part of a research project that aims to assess the needs of Cameroonian youth in terms of prevention of early and unwanted pregnancies and STI/AIDS. Evaluators undertook efforts to determine, before and after the intervention, the level of knowledge and practice of methods for preventing unwanted pregnancies and STI/AIDS so as to assess the efficiency of the "peer education" approach. This process also involved identifying constraints to the use by youth of contraceptive methods in general and condoms in particular.

Partner Text: 

IRESCO, Community Health Directorate of the Ministry of Public Health and various other ministerial departments, with technical and financial assistance from SFPS/Tulane.

Source: 

Sue Alford, MLS, Nicole Cheetham, MHS, and Debra Hauser, MPH, "Science and Success in Developing Countries: Holistic Programs that Work to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, HIV & Sexually Transmitted Infections" [PDF] (Advocates for Youth, 2005); and Entre Nous Jeunes website, February 20 2009.

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