<a href="/entertainment-education/search/apachesolr_search?filters=tid: tid:3915">Featured content</a> http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/promoted-rss.xml/3915 en Hilkor ("Ripples in the Water") and Mai Sari Sunakhari ("Orchid, Like Me") Radio Dramas http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/hilkor-ripples-water-and-mai-sari-sunakhari-orchid-me-radio-dramas <p><em>"Now 22 years old with a 3.5 year old daughter, Lalita lives with her parents and listens avidly to a radio drama, Hilkor ('Ripples in the Water'). In it, she hears her story and she hopes that other girls will know the truth and be able to avoid situations exactly like hers."</em></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-1"> <div class="field-label">Communication Strategies:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>As with all PMC radio serial dramas, Hilkor and Mai Sari Sunakhari were created using PMC's <a href="https://www.populationmedia.org/product/serial-dramas/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">serial drama methodology</a>, which is an adaptation and expansion of the Sabido methodology. Miguel Sabido's insertion of a "transitional" character into the telenovelas he developed was found to drastically increase behaviour change adoption. Sabido wondered why until he found Albert Bandura's Social Learning Theory, which is a theory of learning and development that explains the importance of observational learning. PMC dramas are culturally specific stories with "positive" and "negative" characters, as well as "transitional" ones, to model behaviours. The goal is to broaden the behavioural choices available to the audience by showing a large range of choices and the realistic consequences of different decisions. Hilkor and Mai Sari Sunakhari don't tell people what is "good" or "bad" because that would oppose their goal of introducing more information and encouraging discussion and self-reflection. The dramas contain plots and sub-plots that unfold over time, allowing the audience to get involved with the story and watch the actions and consequences. The goal is to provide powerful stories filled with realistic characters and plot twists that generate a range of emotions as the audience gets pulled into the story.</p> <ul> <li>To read about the characters and storylines of Hilkor, <a href="https://www.populationmedia.org/projects/hilkor/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">click here.</a></li> <li>To read about the characters and storylines of Mai Sari Sunakhari, <a href="https://www.populationmedia.org/projects/mai-sari-sunakhari/#storylines" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">click here.</a></li> </ul> <p>Prominent personnel have lent their voices in an effort to raise awarness about the issues explored in the dramas and draw listeners to them. As people gathered to celebrate the Nepali New Year in 2016, the former Nepali president Right Honorable Former President Ram Baran Yadav, who was married at age 14 (his wife was 12), spoke about the dramas, saying of his own marriage: "that was 60 years ago. The situation on child marriage is almost the same as it was before, especially in Madhesh where I come from. Things need to change." Rajesh Hamal, a Nepali actor with so much notoriety people often call him "Maha-Nayak", which means "Great Actor", promoted Mai Sari Sunakhari on TV spots that have run on national and local stations throughout Nepal. Calling it his favourite radio show, "Hamal is generally not involved in commercial promotion," says Rajan Parajuli, PMC's Country Representative in Nepal. "He is always taken as one of the few intellectual celebrities of the country. The people of Nepal believe his words." Hamal is the ambassador for the National Campaign of the Ministry of Women, Children and Social Welfare in Nepal. He publicly strongly supports ending child marriage and gender-based violence.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-6"> <div class="field-label">Development Issues:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Child Marriage, Domestic Violence, Education, Family Planning, Gender Equality, Gender-Based Violence, Maternal and Child Health, Nutrition, and Reproductive Health</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-2"> <div class="field-label">Key Points:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>According to PMC, Nepal has one of the highest rates of child marriage in the world and has the third highest rate of early marriage in Asia. For many economically poor families, the marriage dowry for their daughter is a necessity, and others suffer from the misperception that women who are not married early are not "pure". Girls Not Brides reports that 41% of Nepali girls are married before they're 18 years old and that the devastation of the 2015 earthquake has put girls and women in even more vulnerable situations that may increase rates of child marriage. PMC reports that only 53% of women over the age of 15 in Nepal can read and write.</p> <p> According to a study done by Samarth-Nepal, 80% of the people of Nepal consider radio to be one of their prime media outlets. Research carried out by Sharecast Initiative Nepal showed that 35% of the respondents tune in to the radio daily.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/files/imagecache/thumbnail/img_2096-web-1000.jpg" alt="" title="Hilkor (&quot;Ripples in the Water&quot;) and Mai Sari Sunakhari (&quot;Orchid, Like Me&quot;) Radio Dramas" class="imagecache imagecache-thumbnail imagecache-default imagecache-thumbnail_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-partner-text"> <div class="field-label">Partner Text:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>PMC and the Antenna Foundation (AFN), with funding from the Kendeda Fund.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-userreference field-field-contact-user-ref"> <div class="field-label">Contacts (user reference):&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Missie Thurston </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-source-text"> <div class="field-label">Source:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2016/04/18/829818/10161898/en/Nepal-s-First-President-Celebrates-Efforts-to-End-Child-Marriage-this-Nepali-New-Year.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">"Nepal's First President Celebrates Efforts to End Child Marriage this Nepali New Year"</a>, April 18 2016 press release, and <a href="https://www.populationmedia.org/projects/hilkor/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Hilkor description on the PMC website</a> and <a href="https://www.populationmedia.org/projects/mai-sari-sunakhari/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Mai Sari Sunakhari page on the PMC website</a>, all accessed on February 24 2017.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/hilkor-ripples-water-and-mai-sari-sunakhari-orchid-me-radio-dramas" target="_blank">read more</a></p> http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/hilkor-ripples-water-and-mai-sari-sunakhari-orchid-me-radio-dramas#comments Nepal Experiences SDG 3: Good Health Children Entertainment Radio Television Gender Gender and Adolescence NGOs Nutrition Reproductive Health Rights Women Youth Adolescent Development Communicating with, for and about children Global Entertainment-Education Fri, 24 Feb 2017 11:52:26 +0000 Missie Thurston 9487447 at http://comminit.com Entertainment-Education and Child Marriage: A Scoping Study for Girls Not Brides http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/entertainment-education-and-child-marriage-scoping-study-girls-not-brides <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-author"> <div class="field-label">Author:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Prof. Dr. Martine Bouman </div> <div class="field-item even"> Dr. Sarah Lubjuhn </div> <div class="field-item odd"> Drs. Hester Hollemans </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-date"><legend>Publication Date</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-text-date"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>January 2017</p> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-1"> <div class="field-label">Affiliation:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Center for Media &amp; Health</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>"Knowing that tackling child marriage requires transforming the attitudes and behaviours that perpetuate the practice among families and communities, Entertainment-Entertainment strategies could be a powerful way to engage individuals and communities to create new norms, values and behaviours."</em></p> <p> Developed by the Center for Media &amp; Health (CMH) and dance4life for Girls Not Brides, this report looks at the opportunities and challenges of entertainment-education (EE) - the use of radio, television, soap operas, theatre, and comic books to effect positive social change - as a way to address child marriage. Informed by a range of practical and theoretical insights, the report analyses a selection of current initiatives (in 9 countries: Pakistan, India, Malawi, Tanzania, Mozambique, South Africa, Nepal, Nigeria, and Nicaragua), draws out key lessons, and provides tips for practitioners and donors of EE initiatives.</p> <div class="field button"><a href="http://www.girlsnotbrides.org/reports-and-publications/entertainment-education-and-child-marriage-a-scoping-study/" 0="a:0:{}" target="_blank">Click here to access the 56-page report in PDF format.</a></div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/files/imagecache/thumbnail/our-negro-mozambique.png.jpg" alt="" title="Entertainment-Education and Child Marriage: A Scoping Study for Girls Not Brides" width="100" height="56" class="imagecache imagecache-thumbnail imagecache-default imagecache-thumbnail_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-userreference field-field-contact-user-ref"> <div class="field-label">Contacts (user reference):&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Martine Bouman </div> <div class="field-item even"> Girls Not Brides </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-source-text"> <div class="field-label">Source:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.girlsnotbrides.org/reports-and-publications/entertainment-education-and-child-marriage-a-scoping-study/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Girls Not Brides website</a> and <a href="http://www.girlsnotbrides.org/entertainment-education-tackling-child-marriage-works" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">"Entertainment-education and tackling child marriage: what works"</a>, by Professor Martine Bouman and Kate Whittington, February 13 2017 - both accessed on February 22 2017, and email from Kate Whittington to The Communication Initiative on February 23 2017. <em>Image credit:</em> Sergio Santimano/Ouro Negro - Mozambique</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/entertainment-education-and-child-marriage-scoping-study-girls-not-brides" target="_blank">read more</a></p> http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/entertainment-education-and-child-marriage-scoping-study-girls-not-brides#comments India Malawi Mozambique Nepal Nicaragua Nigeria Pakistan South Africa Tanzania Strategic Thinking 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years Advocacy SDG 3: Good Health SDG 5: Gender Equality Children Multi-Media Innovations for Behaviour and Social Change Entertainment Live Performance Adolescent Sexual Health Civil Society Adolescents and Education Phone/Mobile Entertainment Orgs Radio Television Research Gender Gender and Adolescence Reproductive Health Rights Youth Featured Adolescent Development Communicating with, for and about children Global Entertainment-Education Wed, 22 Feb 2017 14:54:08 +0000 Martine Bouman 9487378 at http://comminit.com Road Safety Mass Media Campaigns: A Toolkit, Plus a Video Library http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/road-safety-mass-media-campaigns-toolkit-plus-video-library <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-label">Subtitle:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 10 Steps for Developing Road Safety Mass Media Campaigns in Low- and Middle-Income Countries </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-author"> <div class="field-label">Author:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Elena Altieri </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-publication-date"><legend>Publication Date</legend><div class="field field-type-date field-field-date-0"> <div class="field-label">Publication Date:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Friday, January 1, 2016</span> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/files/imagecache/thumbnail/road4.jpg" alt="" title="" width="100" height="57" class="imagecache imagecache-thumbnail imagecache-default imagecache-thumbnail_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <p>"Road user behaviour can be improved by road safety campaigns, which in combination with behavioural measures (e.g., law enforcement, education or training), can become a powerful way to persuade the public to behave more safely in traffic."</p> <div class="field button"><a href="http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/254281/1/9789241511797-eng.pdf?ua=1" 0="a:0:{}" target="_blank">Click here to access the toolkit in PDF format.</a></div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-publisher"> <div class="field-label">Publisher:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/entertainment-education/node/5814">World Health Organization (WHO)</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-1"> <div class="field-label">Number of Pages:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>88</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-userreference field-field-contact-user-ref"> <div class="field-label">Contacts (user reference):&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EleAltComm1976 </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-link-other-nodes"> <div class="field-label">Related Summaries:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/entertainment-education/content/reporting-road-safety-guide-journalists">Reporting on Road Safety: A Guide for Journalists</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-source-text"> <div class="field-label">Source:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Email from Elena Altieri to The Communication Initiative on February 20 2017, and the <a href="http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/publications/road_traffic/media-campaigns/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">WHO website</a>, February 20 2017.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/road-safety-mass-media-campaigns-toolkit-plus-video-library" target="_blank">read more</a></p> http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/road-safety-mass-media-campaigns-toolkit-plus-video-library#comments Brazil Cambodia China India Kenya Mexico Russia Turkey Vietnam Materials Advocacy SDG 12: Responsible Consumption SDG 3: Good Health Community Participation Film and Video Civil Society Phone/Mobile Community Media Marketing Print Radio Television Government Departments Health News Media NGOs Risk Management Featured Global Health Entertainment-Education Mon, 20 Feb 2017 18:38:46 +0000 EleAltComm1976 9487266 at http://comminit.com UNICEF Nepal C4D Response Earthquake 2015 http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/unicef-nepal-c4d-response-earthquake-2015 <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-date"><legend>Publication Date</legend><div class="field field-type-date field-field-date-0"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Tuesday, March 1, 2016</span> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <p>This report highlights the key United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) communication for development (C4D) interventions during the response phase of the April and May 2015 earthquakes, which killed nearly 9,000 and severely affected thousands more. It explains how the UNICEF C4D programme worked at the national and local level with key stakeholders to meet the information and communication needs of affected families and communities.</p> <div class="field button"><a href="https://www.unicef.org/cbsc/files/Nepal_C4D_Earthquake_Response.pdf" 0="s:6:&quot;a:0:{}&quot;;" target="_blank">Click here for the 17-page document in PDF format.</a></div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/files/imagecache/thumbnail/title654502000.png" alt="" title="UNICEF Nepal C4D Response Earthquake 2015" width="100" height="72" class="imagecache imagecache-thumbnail imagecache-default imagecache-thumbnail_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-userreference field-field-contact-user-ref"> <div class="field-label">Contacts (user reference):&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> UNICEF Nepal </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-source-text"> <div class="field-label">Source:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="https://www.unicef.org/cbsc/index_66032.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">UNICEF C4D website</a>, February 17 2017. <em>Image credit:</em> © UNICEF Nepal/2015/KThapa</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/unicef-nepal-c4d-response-earthquake-2015" target="_blank">read more</a></p> http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/unicef-nepal-c4d-response-earthquake-2015#comments Nepal Strategic Thinking Access Children Entertainment Live Performance Person-to-Person Voice Print News/Information Radio Education United Nations Risk Management Youth Featured UNICEF Communicating with, for and about children Global ICT for Development Media Development Entertainment-Education Fri, 17 Feb 2017 14:20:50 +0000 UNICEF Nepal 9487221 at http://comminit.com Peace through Arts http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/peace-through-arts <p>This project aimed at creating a forum for Pakistani youth where they could interact with one another, discuss various issues pertaining to their everyday lives, and express their desire for peace and prosperity through different art forms. Conducted in the Muzaffargarh district of Punjab, Peace through Arts was a youth-led project, with Bedari staff there to facilitate them. Bedari is a national-level non-governmental, voluntary, development organisation in Pakistan working with women and children for the promotion and protection of their human rights. Its goal in creating this project was to convene a diverse group of youth to come together to raise awareness about peace and its significance for prosperity and well-being of the communities.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-1"> <div class="field-label">Communication Strategies:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Peace through Arts is premised on the belief that artistic and cultural activities can be a way to promote harmony, peace, and tolerance. "When a theater performance, a paintings exhibition or music concert is held, it is for everyone. No one asks about the religion or sectarian association of the performers/organizers/participants. People come together, and learn that people from other religions, sects, or ethnic groups are human beings just like us. Religion is a very sensitive issue, and talking directly about the right to belief/religion can be dangerous. Arts can create a good buffer, and we can address the sensitive issue indirectly."</p> <p> The project started with youth mobilisation: Project staff held meetings with youth at various places they gather, such as schools and colleges, sports centres, and villages. With an eye toward ensuring participation of young girls and youth from religious and ethnic minorities as well as from different social/economic classes, Bedari selected 125 youth interested in 5 art forms: theatre, art/photography, music, poetry, and social media. (A baseline survey was conducted to get to know their existing level of tolerance for diversity and their views of various issues that affect the peace of the community). Youth (both male and female) from various sects of Islam and from other religions learned to work together. This approach stems from Bedari's work on peace promotion and conflict migration, which began after a suicide blast in a Shia mosque that resulted in the loss of 26 lives. Through that experience, Bedari learned that young men and women from different sectarian/religious backgrounds can experience a reduction in hatred/misconceptions about others if given the chance to socialise with them. In Peace through Art, a committee of 3 senior members who were elected by consensus was created to resolve any conflicts among the participants of the project.</p> <p> Each group was provided with a mentor, who was responsible for reviewing the artwork already produced by the participants and for helping them polish their art. Each group had 30 sessions in total, spread over a 2-month period. Each group was provided with training on peace and conflict mitigation. The sessions were organised with the larger aim of helping youth understand the deep-rooted concepts and ideas leading to violent extremism. They were taught multiple approaches for initiating healthy dialogues with people having different identities, for instance. They were also provided with training on institution building so that they could get themselves registered if they wished to continue working together in a more organised form after the project's completion.</p> <p> In the second phase of the project, the messages of peace and tolerance were taken to the public domain. Bedari provided participants with opportunities to showcase their art:</p> <ul> <li>The poets organised 3 mushairas (poetry recitation sessions). After no women attended the first one, the group decided to organise a female-exclusive mushaira, which successfully drew more than 60 women.</li> <li>The music group prepared 5 peace songs, which they performed during various events and ceremonies. Videos of the songs were also prepared in partnership with the theatre group. The videos have been played on the local cable TV channel.</li> <li>The art group prepared over 30 paintings, which they shared with the general public through exhibitions in rented halls of private schools/colleges. Some paintings/photographs were displayed in public transport vehicles.</li> <li>The actors developed a street play called "Aman Di Khed" and performed it in various communities. Over 80 performances were held; according to Bedari, the actors became household names. Female group members did not participate in the street performances, so Bedari organised some indoor performances so that women could also participate. The play was also video-recorded and aired on the local cable TV channel. The actors received invitations to perform the play at a peace festival, a women's conference, and events held by the district government's Peace Committee.</li> <li>The social media group were there to disseminate the other groups' products, especially on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/BedariPakistan" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Facebook</a>.</li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-6"> <div class="field-label">Development Issues:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Youth, Conflict</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-2"> <div class="field-label">Key Points:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The project as carried out in Muzaffargarh has been scaled up and is being implemented also in Multan, Bahawalpur, and Lodhran. Sports have also been added to the project activities. Furthermore, self-growth trainings have been organised for the 1,367 participants in the scaled-up version of the project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/files/imagecache/thumbnail/p6240069.jpg" alt="" title="Peace through Arts" width="100" height="75" class="imagecache imagecache-thumbnail imagecache-default imagecache-thumbnail_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-partner-text"> <div class="field-label">Partner Text:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Support from the United States Institute for Peace.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-userreference field-field-contact-user-ref"> <div class="field-label">Contacts (user reference):&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Mehvish Shafiq </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="emvideo emvideo-video emvideo-youtube"><div id="media-youtube-1" class="media-youtube"> <div id="media-youtube-default-external-1"> <object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" height="355" width="425" data="http://www.youtube.com/v/k06wEviTUTk&amp;amp;rel=0&amp;amp;enablejsapi=1&amp;amp;playerapiid=ytplayer&amp;amp;fs=1" id="media-youtube-default-external-object-1"> <param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/k06wEviTUTk&amp;amp;rel=0&amp;amp;enablejsapi=1&amp;amp;playerapiid=ytplayer&amp;amp;fs=1" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="sameDomain"/> <param name="quality" value="best"/> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF"/> <param name="scale" value="noScale"/> <param name="salign" value="TL"/> <param name="FlashVars" value="playerMode=embedded" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <!-- Fallback content --> <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k06wEviTUTk"><img src="http://img.youtube.com/vi/k06wEviTUTk/0.jpg" alt="See video" title="See video" width="425" height="355" /></a> </object> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-source-text"> <div class="field-label">Source:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://www.bedari.org.pk/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Booklet-Peace-through-Arts.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Peace through Arts booklet [PDF]</a>, February 13 2017.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/peace-through-arts#comments Pakistan Experiences Digital Film and Video Conflict Entertainment Live Performance Folk Media Person-to-Person Interpersonal Television Enabling and Inclusive Environments for Adolescents Visual Arts Gender NGOs Youth Adolescent Development Global Entertainment-Education Mon, 13 Feb 2017 20:18:07 +0000 Mehvish Shafiq 9487128 at http://comminit.com Using storytelling to make statistics accessible http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/using-storytelling-make-statistics-accessible <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/files/imagecache/thumbnail/maya_0.jpg" alt="" title="" width="100" height="56" class="imagecache imagecache-thumbnail imagecache-default imagecache-thumbnail_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <p>Author: BBC Media Action Insight's Mahmuda Hoque, on <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/mediaactioninsight/entries/084a5472-a8f0-4c25-8246-cbb1070647a2" target="_blank">February 6 2017</a> - Bangladesh-based researcher Mahmuda Hoque explains how her team created a story about “Maya”, a 19-year-old mother, to help bring their findings about antenatal preparations to life.</p> <p>Researchers often uncover insights with real practical relevance but then struggle to communicate their findings compellingly to those who can make use of them.</p> <p><a href="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/using-storytelling-make-statistics-accessible" target="_blank">read more</a></p> http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/using-storytelling-make-statistics-accessible#comments Bangladesh 15 to 19 years Dialogue, Debate, Conversation Digital SDG 3: Good Health SDG 5: Gender Equality Adolescent Physical Health Blogs: Global Health Policies Entertainment Interpersonal Community Media Print Situation Analysis Questions Entertainment Orgs Radio Television Enabling and Inclusive Environments for Adolescents Research Health NGOs Reproductive Health Women Youth Featured BBC Media Action Adolescent Development Global Policy Blogs Health Media Development Entertainment-Education Thu, 09 Feb 2017 17:06:15 +0000 BBC Media Action 9487058 at http://comminit.com To Take on the Unknown: Dancing Stories of Cervical Cancer http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/take-unknown-dancing-stories-cervical-cancer <div class="field field-type-text field-field-length"> <div class="field-label">Length:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 05&#039;18&quot; </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-date field-field-date-0"> <div class="field-label">Year of Production:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <span class="date-display-single">Friday, January 13, 2017</span> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>"Cervical cancer affects the whole human experience. Understanding these stories requires a medium that can immerse the observer - the medical student or physician - in the same milieu of physicality, mentality, and spirituality as the patients and find a suitable vehicle for all to connect in this journey - that medium for me is dance." - Shilpa Darivemula</em></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field--1-video-director"> <div class="field-label">Director:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Co-Director/Founder of the Aseemkala Initiative, Shilpa Darivemula </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-video-producer"> <div class="field-label">Producer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> James Anderson and Rohini Rau-Murthy </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-video-context"> <div class="field-label">Context:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> According to GIAHC, 99% of cervical cancers are caused by HPV. Eighty percent of cervical cancer cases and 85% of cervical-cancer-related deaths occur in the developing world. Most women present for treatment in very advanced stages of the disease; therein lies the challenge. However, early detection can decrease the number of advanced cervical cancer cases, the financial burden of treating advanced cases, and the loss of life secondary to the disease. Lack of knowledge, poor infrastructure, and limited finances threaten to hamper progress. &quot;Hence, creative models through which people, communities and societies engage collectively, with people helping people with or without government, are necessary for successful control of this cancer.&quot; </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-video-camera"> <div class="field-label">Camera:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> James Anderson and Rohini Rau-Murthy </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/files/imagecache/thumbnail/field/image/dance.png" alt="" title="To Take on the Unknown: Dancing Stories of Cervical Cancer" width="100" height="50" class="imagecache imagecache-thumbnail imagecache-default imagecache-thumbnail_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-music"> <div class="field-label">Original music:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Original Music by Elliot Jason Feld of EJFM 102.7 </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-userreference field-field-contact-user-ref"> <div class="field-label">Contacts (user reference):&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Global Initiati... </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-source-text"> <div class="field-label">Source:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>HPVflash: A news update from the PATH cervical cancer prevention team, February 1 2017; <a href="http://www.giahc.org/institute/news-and-updates.html#article-125" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">GIAHC website</a> and <a href="http://www.aseemkala.org" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Aseemkala Initiative</a>, both accessed on February 2 2017; and email from Shilpa Darivemula to The Communication Initiative on February 3 2017.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/take-unknown-dancing-stories-cervical-cancer" target="_blank">read more</a></p> http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/take-unknown-dancing-stories-cervical-cancer#comments United States SDG 3: Good Health Entertainment Folk Media Person-to-Person Health NGOs Immunisation and Vaccines Women Featured Global Health Entertainment-Education Thu, 02 Feb 2017 15:34:06 +0000 Global Initiative Against HPV and Cervical Cancer 9486898 at http://comminit.com Menstrupedia http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/menstrupedia <p>Launched in 2012, Menstrupedia is an effort to open up the conversation on menstruation in India, where discussion of the topic is taboo. The organisation aims to promote awareness and act as a guide to periods for girls and women, using a comic book, a website, videos, and social media.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-1"> <div class="field-label">Communication Strategies:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Drawing on the entertainment-education approach, the Menstrupedia comic book is meant to be a colorful, fun, and accessible guide to menstruation designed for girls aged nine and above. Having been reviewed by medical professionals to ensure its accuracy, it shows the female anatomy properly to debunk misperceptions about the process. The comic follows the journey of three young girls and their experiences with periods. All the characters and storylines are adapted from real-life experiences that the Menstrupedia founder, Aditi Gupta, collected during the research process to create the book. Each character represents a stage of adolescence: girls who haven't started their period yet and want to learn more about them; girls who have just started their period and want advice on how to prepare for them; and girls who have had periods for some time and might be curious about the myths surrounding them. "Myth breaking and period positivity are our strategies, and we wanted to make it a comic book because it's inclusive," Gupta says. "We wanted to do it in a positive and matter-of-fact way to debunk misconceptions, and so that parents and teachers would be comfortable using it. Girls can read it and say, 'Oh, this happened to me too!'"</p> <p> Heavily subsidised for schools and non-governmental organisations (NGOs), the comic has been integrated into the curriculum of more than 75 schools and used by 25 NGOs across India - reaching 70,000 girls. It has been translated into 11 languages and is available for order on the <a href="https://menstrupedia.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Menstrupedia website</a>. Also there offered for free downloads is "Hello Periods", an educational video that teachers can use to conduct a menstrual awareness workshop. For other Menstrupedia videos and content, visit their <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/menstrupedia" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">YouTube channel</a> and/or <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/menstrupedia" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Facebook page</a>.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-6"> <div class="field-label">Development Issues:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Girls, Health</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-2"> <div class="field-label">Key Points:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Especially in India and across South Asia, the reluctance to speak about periods is widespread, resulting in low education and awareness - particularly among the demographic of adolescent girls, of whom India has some 120 million. A study for Menstrual Hygiene Day reported that 1 out of 3 schoolgirls across South Asia was not aware of periods before experiencing one for the first time, and only 2.5% of the same group knew that menstrual blood came from the uterus. When girls in India get their periods, they are considered impure for those 7 days, which can instill a sense of shame.</p> <p> An estimated 1 in 5 girls in India drops out of school because of menstruation and a lack of toilets. Prime Minister Narendra Modi sought to address these problems in his introduction to the <a href="https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/menstrual-hygiene-impacts-environment/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Clean India campaign</a> in 2014, where he advocated for all schools in the country to have separate toilets for girls. Other regional start-ups have sprung into action, such as the social enterprise <a href="http://binti.co.uk/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Binti Period</a>, which creates community projects enabling women to produce sanitary towels sustainably. The stigma was addressed in 2015 by Whisper, a sanitary towel manufacturer, in an award-winning campaign called <a href="http://adage.com/article/special-report-cannes-lions/p-g-whisper-s-touch-pickle-wins-glass-grand-prix/299182/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Touch the Pickle</a>. A key social convention in India prevents girls who are menstruating from touching popular preserved foods, like pickles, because of the belief that the food will spoil. Whisper's advert depicted girls and women actively breaking that taboo. Whisper approached the Menstrupedia founder about buying advertising space in the Menstrupedia comic and became a partner before the book was even created.</p> <p> Menstrupedia founder says: "This is only the beginning of our work. We want to produce the comic for all South Asian countries, and we want to do it for African countries too. The amount of international orders we get makes us realize the taboo is everywhere," Gupta says. "Our plan is to build an educational infrastructure, not only for girls but for everybody, to talk about periods in a friendly, free way. I know it's going to take decades, but eventually, I want to raise a generation of girls who are period positive when they become mothers. When they raise their own girls, period taboos would just vanish from that generation - they wouldn't even know such a taboo existed."</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/files/imagecache/thumbnail/14484972_1054860951293389_3420500085441109397_n.jpg" alt="" title="Menstrupedia" width="100" height="67" class="imagecache imagecache-thumbnail imagecache-default imagecache-thumbnail_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-userreference field-field-contact-user-ref"> <div class="field-label">Contacts (user reference):&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Menstrupedia </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="emvideo emvideo-video emvideo-youtube"><div id="media-youtube-2" class="media-youtube"> <div id="media-youtube-default-external-2"> <object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" height="355" width="425" data="http://www.youtube.com/v/9NyrsmjWwJs&amp;amp;rel=0&amp;amp;enablejsapi=1&amp;amp;playerapiid=ytplayer&amp;amp;fs=1" id="media-youtube-default-external-object-2"> <param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/9NyrsmjWwJs&amp;amp;rel=0&amp;amp;enablejsapi=1&amp;amp;playerapiid=ytplayer&amp;amp;fs=1" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="sameDomain"/> <param name="quality" value="best"/> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF"/> <param name="scale" value="noScale"/> <param name="salign" value="TL"/> <param name="FlashVars" value="playerMode=embedded" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <!-- Fallback content --> <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NyrsmjWwJs"><img src="http://img.youtube.com/vi/9NyrsmjWwJs/0.jpg" alt="See video" title="See video" width="425" height="355" /></a> </object> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-source-text"> <div class="field-label">Source:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="http://time.com/4590678/menstrupedia-aditi-gupta-taboo-india/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">"How an Indian Comic Book Is Teaching Girls About Their Periods"</a>, <em>Time</em>, by Suyin Haynes, December 12 2016, and <a href="https://menstrupedia.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Menstrupedia website</a> - both accessed on January 26 2017.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/menstrupedia#comments India Experiences Academic Institutions Digital SDG 3: Good Health Children Film and Video Entertainment Adolescent Sexual Health Person-to-Person Print News/Information Health NGOs Reproductive Health Women Youth Adolescent Development Communicating with, for and about children Global Health Entertainment-Education Thu, 26 Jan 2017 13:18:06 +0000 Menstrupedia 9486718 at http://comminit.com Change Starts at Home http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/change-starts-home <p>Equal Access (EA)'s Change Starts at Home (Change) initiative uses a multi-component social behaviour change communication (SBCC) strategy involving a radio drama and community mobilisation to shift attitudes, norms, and behaviours that underpin intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration in Nepal. It is being carried out in 3 districts - Nawalparasi, Chitwan, and Kapilvastu - as part of a randomised control trial (RCT) to examine potential pathways of change over the 3-year project period, designed to fill a gap: a perceived dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of primary violence prevention strategies. Whilst the project's main objective is to give married couples the knowledge, skills, and space to safely address power imbalances in their relationships, the impact is reinforced by activities that aim to bring couples and their family members and community leaders together in a movement to change social attitudes and practices towards girls and women in Nepal.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-1"> <div class="field-label">Communication Strategies:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Recognising the social ecology of change, the Change intervention engages actors across multiple domains of influence, such as family members and community leaders, in addition to the primary intended audience of married reproductive age women and their husbands. As a SBCC strategy, the intervention approaches IPV prevention through 3 key approaches: advocacy, social mobilisation, and behaviour change communication. The latter component is a 9-month, weekly radio drama with listener engagement through interactive voice response (IVR) and short message service (SMS), to which both the intervention and control conditions are exposed. The intervention communities are further engaged in radio Listening and Discussion Groups (LDGs). These 72 LDGs are made up of a total of 360 married couples / 720 individuals, who meet on a weekly basis in gender segregated groups, but with combined sessions for couples to come together once a month. Each week, members are guided by a trained facilitator through a curriculum-based process of listening, discussion, activities, reflection and home-based tasks. LDGs serve as venues for life skills building and act as a platform through which community outreach activities are planned and executed, alongside local leaders who receive training and support to act as advocates in the community for more equitable social norms. </p> <p> Specifically:</p> <ul> <li>Individuals in study communities (both intervention and control) are reached through radio programming that is entertaining and educational - a form of "edutainment" - that models non-violent behaviour and supports acquisition of life skills. The name of the radio programming broadcast during Change is called Samajhdari, which is Nepali for mutual understanding. The 30-minute drama is focused around a hotel along the East West Highway in Nepal that is run by a couple who, comparatively, have a positive and gender-equitable relationship. Their hotel is popular among travellers passing by, and the couple welcome different characters who meet to discuss and exchange stories about problems related to marriage, power, and gender identities. Local voices in the form of Vox Pops, interviews, and case studies are woven into the drama, which is followed by a summary segment that also showcases the IVR responses sent to the programme from listeners. <a href="http://equalaccess.org.np/multimedia-category/samajhdari/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Click here to listen to Samajhdari episodes.</a></li> <li>The project engages and mobilises community members within LDGs to promote discussion, reflection, and critical thinking around radio-broadcasted messages to facilitate behaviour change. EA trains facilitators that convene the discussion groups following a weekly curriculum that includes in-session activities and at-home tasks to be carried out with their spouse. This peer-to-peer group is meant to be a safe place to explore with greater depth some of the issues raised in the radio programme. Through tablet-based facilitator feedback forms and monitoring visits (captured through IVR forms), EA collects information and records listener reactions to the radio episodes, capturing perspectives on issues and feedback on which elements were of most interest to listeners, areas for improvement, questions, and requests for additional information. This feedback is then shared with EA's production team to guide the content of future episodes. LDGs also receive a tool kit to support community interactions, including a gender-focused film and for community screenings, a video recording of the gender-focused street theatre (below), audio from select radio sessions, and printed materials including a poster explaining the project. In addition to financial resources, this toolkit is meant to support the LDGs in holding awareness-raising events in their communities. Direct engagement of community leaders, family members, and friends of LDG members is expected to assist in facilitating the integration of the new social norms.</li> <li>The purpose of the street theatre is to allow large numbers of community members to be exposed to messaging that focuses on gender equity and to encourage them to interact with the issues through the drama. Throughout December 2016 and January 2017, Change and EA's partner Vijaya Development Resource Center (VDRC) organised 18 interactive street dramas across the 3 project districts. The dramas were performed by a local theatre group, Susheli Kala Samuha, and were watched by over 4,000 people in total. These were professionally recorded so that other communities without access to live performances can view the screenings; see the <a href="https://change-starts-at-home.com" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Change website</a>. (The project also has a Twitter handle: @changestartsww and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ChangeStartsAtHome" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Change Facebook page</a>.)</li> <li>Community leaders were trained in a 2-day workshop designed to: 1) introduce Change to key stakeholders who are knowledgeable and supportive of the project; 2) facilitate smooth implementation of project activities by getting community leader buy-in; 3) strengthen ties between EA/VDRC and the religious/community leaders to encourage better-coordinated responses to violence against women and girls (VAWG); and 4) provide a forum for the religious and community leaders to reflect on their own position and capacity to comprehend and respond to VAWG, especially IPV. To that end, in October 2016, Change organised a workshop with religious leaders, most of whom were leaders from Nepal's 3 major religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, and Christianity. Community leaders from other diverse background were also invited, including social workers, teachers, members of local co-operative institutions, and other community-based organisations. As part of this discussion on how religion and various cultural practices are perpetuating violence against women, EA facilitators kept the dialogue open by making it clear from the beginning that this would not be a training in the traditional sense, but more like a discussion forum. This meant that rather than the facilitator "teaching" the group, everyone was there to share their views openly and to listen to another person's perspective without any biases or judgment. According to EA, this approach helped participants to feel comfortable and willing to actively participate in a constructive discussion, rather than passively sitting through a training. By the end of 3 days, the group had managed to bring out various views and opinions on the current situation of women in the communities and what role religion and culture can play in women's equity and empowerment. There was reportedly a common agreement among the participants that religious teachings have been misinterpreted and that they should not be used to justify or ignore violence against women in their communities. Participants unanimously agreed that nothing can justify any form of violence against a human being and that religion can be a powerful tool to uphold this. There was a strong commitment from participating leaders to go back to their communities and organise various activities to raise awareness about VAWG and IPV. They even worked on their own action plans, including details on the type of activities they will conduct with a tentative timeline as part of their efforts to slowly change as an entire community until the social norms that accept, ignore, and even promote violence no longer exist. A follow-up session is planned for February 2017.</li> </ul> <p>The Change intervention relies on a number of theoretical models, including: the Socio-Ecological Model (to conceptualise the multiple contexts and factors that influence behaviour change), the Steps to Behaviour Change Framework and the Integrative Model of Behaviour Prediction (to anchor project activities and curriculum to particular stages and entry points toward behaviour change), and the Diffusion of Innovations theory (to guide efforts to extend the impact of the intervention beyond those most directly exposed). Collectively, the theoretical underpinning of the project recognises that change is a process, although not necessarily linear, that occurs within embedded contexts of interpersonal, social, and political contexts. This process involves:</p> <ul> <li>Phase 1: knowledge and approval - Current behavioural, normative, and control beliefs related to gender norms and VAWG are identified and questioned through a mix of information, role modelling, and discussions that highlight the diversity within "normative" behaviour. During this phase, couples (both as listeners to the radio programme and participants in the LDG sessions) are asked to not only acknowledge the existence of a range of behavioural, normative, and control beliefs, but to also approve of and internalise those alternatives for themselves. By asking people to accept (and consider applying) new norms and roles, phase 1 begins to shift negative attitudes related to acceptability of VAWG towards positive attitudes of acceptability of non-violence.</li> <li>Phase 2: intention - The focus on life skills-based information and education (through both the radio programme and LDG curriculum) in this phase enables couples to not only accept that alternative norms and roles exist, but to develop beliefs and skills (example: good communication, empathy, critical thinking, self-awareness) necessary to begin achieving more equitable power in their own relationships. By this phase, those couples who are part of the LDGs should also begin to experience the positive benefits of having a new reference group / positive social identity supporting them to make good decisions as individuals and as a couple.</li> <li>Phase 3: practice and advocacy - As per the integrative model, alongside intention and skills, behaviour change is most likely to occur if people have the necessary environment required to support the change. Therefore, whilst the primary beneficiaries of Change are couples, family and community members are also reached (through community activities faciliated through the training sessions described above and the radio programme) to ensure they provide an enabling environment and serve as catalysts for change. For instance, family members of LDG participants will be invited to special family-oriented LDG sessions alongside community-based events, such as community theatre, town hall meetings, etc. Together, these activities at the various levels of society are hypothesised to affect beliefs, behaviours, and perceptions of social norms to reduce IPV.</li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-6"> <div class="field-label">Development Issues:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Violence against Women</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-2"> <div class="field-label">Key Points:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>As of this writing, an RCT is being conducted - <a href="https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-016-3909-9" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">click here for details on the study protocol</a> - that seeks to: a) assess whether the multicomponent Change programme (i.e., media + community engagement strategy) yields a greater reduction in cluster-level IPV rates compared to the Change radio programme alone; b) determine whether any potential reductions in cluster-level IPV rates are sustained 6 months after cessation of intervention activities; c) explore what mechanisms and factors may explain any differences that may or may not be detected; and d) identify potential socio-demographic or contextual factors that may moderate the impact of the Change programme. Secondarily, the trial expects to observe improved conflict resolution techniques, couple communication, attitudes toward gender equity and acceptability of IPV, and perceptions of community acceptance of IPV among Change intervention communities versus communities receiving the Change radio programming alone. As the target of the intervention is social norms underpinning individual behaviour, a cluster design is utilised. The quantitative aspect of the evaluation is a pair-matched, repeated cross-sectional 2-armed, single-blinded trial (RCT: N = 36 clusters [Village Development Committees (VDCs)], 1,440 individuals), comparing the SBCC strategy to radio programming alone for its impact on physical and / or sexual IPV at the end of programming (12 months post-baseline; February-March 2017) and 6-months post the cessation of project activities (18-months post baseline; September-October 2017). The qualitative aspects of the design include several longitudinal approaches to understand the impact of the intervention and examine mechanisms of change, including in-depth interviews with participants (N = 18 couples), and focus group discussions with community leaders (N = 3) and family members of participants (N = 12).</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/files/imagecache/thumbnail/title991932446.png" alt="" title="Change Starts at Home" width="100" height="66" class="imagecache imagecache-thumbnail imagecache-default imagecache-thumbnail_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-partner-text"> <div class="field-label">Partner Text:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>EA, with local implementing partner VDRC. Funding by the United Kingdom (UK) Department for International Development (DfID) through the What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women Innovation Fund.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-userreference field-field-contact-user-ref"> <div class="field-label">Contacts (user reference):&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Gemma Ferguson </div> <div class="field-item even"> carijoclark </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="emvideo emvideo-video emvideo-youtube"><div id="media-youtube-3" class="media-youtube"> <div id="media-youtube-default-external-3"> <object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" height="355" width="425" data="http://www.youtube.com/v/jyvcA9fG0ts&amp;amp;rel=0&amp;amp;enablejsapi=1&amp;amp;playerapiid=ytplayer&amp;amp;fs=1" id="media-youtube-default-external-object-3"> <param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/jyvcA9fG0ts&amp;amp;rel=0&amp;amp;enablejsapi=1&amp;amp;playerapiid=ytplayer&amp;amp;fs=1" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="sameDomain"/> <param name="quality" value="best"/> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF"/> <param name="scale" value="noScale"/> <param name="salign" value="TL"/> <param name="FlashVars" value="playerMode=embedded" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <!-- Fallback content --> <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyvcA9fG0ts"><img src="http://img.youtube.com/vi/jyvcA9fG0ts/0.jpg" alt="See video" title="See video" width="425" height="355" /></a> </object> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-source-text"> <div class="field-label">Source:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-016-3909-9" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">"Evaluating a Multicomponent Social Behaviour Change Communication Strategy to Reduce Intimate Partner Violence among Married Couples: Study Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Trial in Nepal"</a>, by Cari Jo Clark, Rachael A. Spencer, Binita Shrestha, Gemma Ferguson, J. Michael Oakes, and Jhumka Gupta. <em>BMC Public Health</em> 2017, 17:75. DOI: 10.1186/s12889-016-3909-9; <a href="https://change-starts-at-home.com" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Change website</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ChangeStartsAtHome" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Change Facebook page</a> - both accessed on January 25 2017; and email from Gemma Ferguson to The Communication Initiative on January 26 2017.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/change-starts-home#comments Nepal Experiences Advocacy SDG 3: Good Health Community Participation Bilaterals Entertainment Live Performance Person-to-Person Interpersonal Phone/Mobile Print News/Information Radio Research Gender Health NGOs Rights Women Featured DFID Global ICT for Development Entertainment-Education Wed, 25 Jan 2017 18:41:38 +0000 Gemma Ferguson 9486699 at http://comminit.com UNESCO Values Education through Sport Materials http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/unesco-values-education-through-sport-materials <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-publication-date"><legend>Publication Date</legend><div class="field field-type-number-integer field-field-year"> <div class="field-label">Year:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 2016 </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img src="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/files/imagecache/thumbnail/screen_shot_2017-01-16_at_13.01.47.png" alt="" title="UNESCO Values Education through Sport Materials" width="100" height="70" class="imagecache imagecache-thumbnail imagecache-default imagecache-thumbnail_default"/> </div> </div> </div> <p>The United Nations Organization for Education, Science and Culture (UNESCO) has developed a set of materials to support their campaign to promote the role of sport in delivering values education. The materials consist of a motion design animation, a photo book, an info graphic, and a dedicated webpage. The Values Education through Sport (VETS) campaign seeks to promote the use of sport and physical activity as an entry point for the delivery of values education, both in schools and, more generally, in society. As sport promotes equality, inclusion, respect, and fairness, it is seen as a perfect entry point to promote these core values and to empower students to be engaged, motivated and active in society. </p> <div class="field field-type-link field-field-pdflink"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0024/002443/244344M.pdf" target="_blank">Click here to download the 36-page book in PDF format.</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-publisher"> <div class="field-label">Publisher:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/entertainment-education/node/5107">United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-cost-ma"> <div class="field-label">Cost:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Free to download </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-long-text-2"> <div class="field-label">Languages:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>English, French, and Portuguese</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-userreference field-field-contact-user-ref"> <div class="field-label">Contacts (user reference):&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> United Nations ... </div> <div class="field-item even"> Nancy Mclennan ... </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-source-text"> <div class="field-label">Source:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/redirect.cgi?r=http://www.unesco.org/new/en/social-and-human-sciences/themes/physical-education-and-sport/values-education-through-sport/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">UNESCO website</a> on January 16 2017.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-emvideo field-field-video"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <div class="emvideo emvideo-video emvideo-youtube"><div id="media-youtube-4" class="media-youtube"> <div id="media-youtube-default-external-4"> <object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" height="658" width="800" data="http://www.youtube.com/v/K4mhtXPVAI0&amp;amp;rel=0&amp;amp;autoplay=1&amp;amp;enablejsapi=1&amp;amp;playerapiid=ytplayer&amp;amp;fs=1" id="media-youtube-default-external-object-4"> <param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/K4mhtXPVAI0&amp;amp;rel=0&amp;amp;autoplay=1&amp;amp;enablejsapi=1&amp;amp;playerapiid=ytplayer&amp;amp;fs=1" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="sameDomain"/> <param name="quality" value="best"/> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF"/> <param name="scale" value="noScale"/> <param name="salign" value="TL"/> <param name="FlashVars" value="playerMode=embedded" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <!-- Fallback content --> <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K4mhtXPVAI0"><img src="http://img.youtube.com/vi/K4mhtXPVAI0/0.jpg" alt="See video" title="See video" width="800" height="658" /></a> </object> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/unesco-values-education-through-sport-materials" target="_blank">read more</a></p> http://comminit.com/entertainment-education/content/unesco-values-education-through-sport-materials#comments Global Materials Advocacy Entertainment Person-to-Person Governance and Democracy Interpersonal Education Visual Arts Gender Sports Orgs United Nations Rights Youth Communicating with, for and about children Global Edutainment - Africa Entertainment-Education Africa Mon, 16 Jan 2017 11:07:34 +0000 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisa 9486503 at http://comminit.com