Most Recent Knowledge Shared from the Network

June 21, 2017

Improving Maternal and Child Health through Media in South Sudan

"Since 2012, BBC Media Action has been funded by DFID to produce a range of programmes and deliver capacity-strengthening activities aiming to support improved reproductive, maternal, neonatal and...

June 6, 2017

Advocacy for Stronger Infant and Young Child Feeding Policies and Programs for Decentralized Government Models: Lessons Learned From Alive & Thrive

"With the [Vietnamese] government's move toward decentralization, Alive & Thrive identified an opportunity to influence localized nutrition policies through the annual Provincial Planning for...

May 24, 2017

Partnering with Women's Associations to Advocate for Stronger Infant and Young Child Feeding Policies and Programs: Lessons Learned From Alive & Thrive

"In many countries throughout the developing world, women’s associations can be influential advocacy and education organizations that represent the voices of mothers to government and legislative...

May 24, 2017

Engaging Medical Associations to Support Optimal Infant and Young Child Feeding: Lessons Learned From Alive & Thrive

"Medical communities around the world play an important role in educating families about early child nutrition. Creating an enabling environment for mothers and families to adopt optimal IYCF [infant...

May 23, 2017

The art of designing surveys about social norms: insights from Ethiopia

Author: BBC Media Action's Hilina Assefa and Lois Aspinall, originally published on May 17 2017 - How we view our role and relationships within our communities shapes how we behave – with important...

May 17, 2017

Media Engagement and Capacity-Building to Increase Commitment to IYCF Policies and Programs: Lessons Learned from Alive & Thrive

"From 2010-2014, Alive & Thrive worked in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, and Viet Nam to reduce undernutrition and death caused by sub-optimal infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices.... The...

April 26, 2017

Rethinking Communication for Maternal and Child Health: Lessons from the Shaping Demand and Practices Project in Bihar, Northern India

"Between 2011 and 2015, BBC Media Action and its partners implemented a... project to improve family health in Bihar, one of the poorest and most populous states in India. Called Shaping Demand and...

February 7, 2017

Prevention is better than cure

Author: BBC Media Action's Betty Duku, posted February 1 2017 - How local and national radio is supporting work to prevent cholera in South Sudan. “I didn’t know it was cholera until a health...

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Journalism without Gatekeepers/Editors: Negative Impact of Social Media on Journalism in Pakistan

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Author: Kaleem Butt, June 7 2017: The gatekeeper/editor plays a very vital role in journalism; a gatekeeper/editor is a person who is responsible for what is published or broadcast, he/she takes care of grammatical mistakes and whether the available information could be transformed into news. He/she double checks the accuracy of the information before making it public property. But after the emergence of social media, there has been negative impact on mainstream journalism. From 2000 onwards, social media has changed the shape of communication throughout the world People worldwide have been connected through social media platforms like Facebook, originally created as a platform for university students by Mark Zuckerberg, a student of Harvard University in 2004. Since then this medium has gained great popularity worldwide.

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The Press Club Hegemony in Pakistan

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Author: Kaleem Butt, June 6 2017 - It is very true that Pakistan is considered to be one of the most dangerous places for journalism. Journalists are killed, tortured, injured, and blackmailed by state as well as non-state actors, at an average of 5 journalists every year. The Pakistani journalists not only face threats of life and job, but the very press clubs that are considered a second home for journalists have also added fuel to the fire. 

The role of press clubs in most other countries is to entertain the journalists – they are simply defined as a place where journalists come and relax and enjoy themselves. However, press clubs in Pakistan have a totally different role; they play a wider, hegemonic role in the news industry. Countries like Japan also have this hegemony of press clubs and locally in Japan they are called "Kisha Clubs."  

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Zambia's Changing Media Face: Politics and Media Unlikely Friends

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Author:  Journalist, Media Consultant and Economist Daniel Tonga, June 6 2017 - Over the last few years, the media in Zambia has gone through a lot of changes. The major reasons for these changes have been both political and economic. The pressures of politics and hash economics times have forced the media to drift away from professional values, ethics and objectivities. Back in early 90s, Zambia’s media was professional, objective, ethical and fair in all ways; and this was partly because, then, journalists understood the importance of sticking to these values in their work. Ethics, objectivity, fairness and professional values defined the media. Unfortunately, over time the Zambian media has become too political and polarised. All professional values known for years as essentials and pillars of the media have been thrown out of the window with no place in today’s media.

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Health partnerships in the Global South: more than a marriage of convenience

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Author: BBC Media Action's Acting Head of Health and Resilience Sophia Wilkinson, originally posted on May 24 2017 - We use the word 'partnership' a lot in the development world. At a global level, we’re all 'partners' - a giant family of policymakers, donors, practitioners, academics and companies working together to advance a shared vision of a world free from poverty, hunger and violent conflict.

We come together for mutual benefit, bringing our different skills, experiences and resources to the table, to solve deeply rooted problems. But because we’re human, partnerships – as with any relationship – can be fraught with friction and misunderstanding. 

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Sindhi Press against Censorship during the Zia Regime (1977-1988)

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Author: Kaleem Butt, May 31 2015 - Introduction: In this era when there is democracy everywhere in the world, still there are many nations that are striving for liberty and autonomy. One such country is Pakistan that has seen direct martial law for half of its period since creation, while the other half has been controlled by the military. After the death of Pakistan’s founding father Mohammad Ali Jinnah and assassination of its first Prime Minister Liaquat Ali Khan, there has been no way to stop the military from getting power and all its accessories. 

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Sexual and reproductive health and rights and SDGs

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Author: Ranjani K. Murthy, May 25 2017 - Sexual and reproductive health refers to a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease, in all matters relating to the sexuality and reproductive system/ processes. Reproductive and sexual rights pertain to right to make informed decisions concerning reproduction, relations/marriage and sexuality free of discrimination, coercion and violence.  

A review of SDGs suggests that targets on universal access to SRHR (within SDG 3 and SDG 5), eliminating violence against women and girls in public and private spheres,  eliminate harmful practices such as early and forced marriages,  reducing maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births (SDG 3) and achieving internationally agreed targets to address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women (SDG 2) have been included. 

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The art of designing surveys about social norms: insights from Ethiopia

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Author: BBC Media Action's Hilina Assefa and Lois Aspinall, originally published on May 17 2017 - How we view our role and relationships within our communities shapes how we behave – with important consequences for development. When widespread, these views constitute ‘social norms’, which people tend to follow because they believe that others do and because they think it’s expected of them. Media Action’s programmes aim to challenge social norms that can lead to people risking their health and reinforce those that support people to make healthier choices.

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Pakistan's Agenda against Climate Change

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Author: Ghulam Shabir Arain, May 23 2017 - Pakistan still lags behind in its coverage of climate change issues. We are too focused on extremism and governance issues, which take up a lot of our attention, resources and time. While the media in regional countries like India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and the Maldives have a good understanding of global climate change negotiations and are well aware of climate change and its impact on their countries. As a vulnerable country, we have to see what we need to do; we also need programmes to bring this about in schools and colleges. We have to prepare the younger generation for the world that they are going to inherit.

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Three ways of communicating to stop disasters happening

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Author: Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Disaster Risk Reduction [DRR] Robert Glasser, originally published on  May 12 2017 - This past March, Peru was hit by devastating floods. Media reports led with death tolls and declarations of states of emergency. People volunteered their help on Facebook and offered refuge in their homes to those seeking shelter on Airbnb.

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Democracy with winning candidate - Feudal in Pakistan

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Author: Sahib Khan, May 10 2017 - For the first time, the second-elected Pakistan Muslim League Nawaz (PML-N)-led government in Pakistan is completing its constitutional tenure in Pakistan, and the next elections are expected to be held in mid-2018. Earlier, the elected Pakistan People’s Party (PPP)-led government made history by completing its first constitutional tenure in Pakistan from 2008 to 2013. The PML-N and the PPP are two major parties in Pakistan, and Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) emerged as 3rd political party in elections of 2013.
 
As days of elections are coming nearer, every party is making its strategy to win the elections and form the government. The winning strategy being adopted by every party planning to participate in upcoming elections is to assimilate winning “horses” (candidates) in different provinces, especially rural areas of Pakistan.
 

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Featured Knowledge Shared

March 7, 2017

The space for people and organisations active on communication and media development in the Middle East and North Africa

March 6, 2017

Many best wishes. The Communication Initiative and UNICEF New York (...

February 14, 2017

The CORE Group Polio Project (CGPP) is inviting front-line practitioners, non-governmental organisation (NGO) staff, academics, researchers, and...

February 7, 2017

Author: BBC Media Action's Betty Duku,...

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