15 to 19 years

The 15 to 19 years category age group category required by UNICEF Adolescent Health

A National Evaluation Framework: Preventing Violence against Women and Girls through Male Engagement

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Publication Date
Publication Date: 
September 28, 2015

This national evaluation framework (NEF) is created "to provide guidance for organizations seeking to clarify intended impacts and outcomes resulting from gender-based violence [GBV] prevention programming."

The National Community of Practice (NCoP) of Canadian organisations working on gender violence and White Ribbon Canada collectively created the NEF to offer sample indicators across four levels of change and eight outcome areas in order to support organisations in measuring what works to create male engagement programming to respond to and prevent violence against women and girls. (See Related Summaries below for more on the process of its creation and on strategic objectives, challenges, and enabling factors.)

Number of Pages: 

20

Source: 

Email from Kate Bojin to The Communication Initiative on October 6 and 9 2015, and Preventing Violence against Women and Girls through Male Engagement: Exploring a National Evaluation Framework, October 8 2015.

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Open Institute Cambodia: Young Women's Leadership Network

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This project "Strengthening Capacity of Young Women’s Leadership Network" (YWLN) aims to increase the participation of young women, including young women and girls living with HIV (YW/GLHIV) and lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (LBT) people, "in political dialogue, and to raise awareness of the rights of YW/GLHIV and LBT people and the need for accountability to gender equality commitments" in Cambodia.

Communication Strategies: 

The project has the following four objectives:

  1. "Provide ... increased knowledge and skills to raise awareness of the rights of LBT and women and girls living with HIV/AIDS;
  2. Strengthen dialogue between rights holders and duty bearers at the subnational level to build demand for gender-responsive policy implementation;
  3. Improve capacity for collective advocacy by ...YW/GLHIV, and young LBTs... which is informed by awareness of their rights and influences public/policy dialogue on HIV and LBT; and
  4. Increase awareness of women’s human rights in relation to YW/GLHIV and young LBT persons."

 

Through a meeting of members of the Young Women’s Leadership Network with YW/GLHIV and LBT groups, a common set of messages and agenda began to emerge. Group discussion was conducted among the participants at the partnership engagement meeting to identify challenges, needs, and key messages to be voiced. The messages were: "to stop all forms of discrimination against YW/GLHIV and LBTs" and "that YW/GLHIV and LBTs have the same human rights as other people." Participants voiced challenges, such as: finding support, including family support, for education and healthcare; obtaining ID cards; and being subjected to forced marriages.

 

The attendees suggested the following needs and interventions:

  • A need for "capacity building on HIV and LBT awareness to communities to reduce discrimination against YW/GLHIV and LBT."
  • An "LBT request that the government stop discriminating against them and provide them with ID [identity] cards...."
  • A need for "educational materials for young girls living with HIV so that they can continue to go to school (they lack text books and other education materials)."
  • A request that government "create jobs for YW/GLHIV in communities or at the nearest villages."
  • A request to "have vocational training to YW/GLHIV and LBTs to have access to income generated and provide micro finance for them to start their own businesses after the training."
  • A request for authorities "to allow the young women, especially YW/GLHIV and LBT, to join commune council’s monthly or quarterly meetings to voice their concern and needs."
  • A need for "health care support and ARV [antiretroviral] regularly and free to the YW/GLHIV and LBTs (who are HIV affected)."

 

The project plans to build participant capacity for joint strategic advocacy on policy issues to address their collective concerns. This includes recognition of the "need to organize, bind together, and mount their actions upon a platform of solidarity. Thus, collective empowerment and action among the most marginalized is an approach that this project will test and attempt to prove as workable. Support will be provided to the development of a common agenda for advocacy and action; the adoption of a shared communication and information strategy; building capacities for advocacy; and pursuing opportunities to influence policy dialogues.... Underlying all of the processes and activities will be a systematic learning-by-doing, mentoring, coaching and technical guidance and capacity building interventions for skills of YWLN to lead joint advocacy and collective communications with YW/GLHIV and LBT." 

Development Issues: 

Education, Health, Gender, HIV, Rights, Women, Youth

Key Points: 

"The Cambodian Constitution states the right of all Cambodians to be treated equally. While Cambodian National laws and policies do not identify same-sex activities as a criminal offence, the rights of LGBT’s [lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender] are not stipulated in any laws or policies. There is no law sanctioning anti-discrimination or punishment for those who violate the rights of LBT people."

Partner Text: 

Open Institute, UN Women, YWLN, Cambodian People Living with HIV Network (CPN)+, Cambodian Community of Women (CCW), CamASEAN, CHEMS, Khmer Youth for Social Development (KYSD). The project also works with Commune Sangkat Council Association and with National AIDS Authority (NAA) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

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Voice and Agency: Empowering Women and Girls for Shared Prosperity

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Author: 
Jeni Klugman
Lucia Hanmer
Sarah Twigg
Tazeen Hasan
Jennifer McCleary-Sills
Julieth Santamaria
Publication Date
September 1, 2014
Affiliation: 

World Bank Group (Klugman, Hanmer, Twigg, Hasan, McCleary-Sills) Inter-American Development Bank (Santamaria)

 

Source: 

The World Bank Group's Open Knowledge Repository (OKR), accessed October 2 2015. Image caption/credit: A woman raises her hand to speak at a community meeting in Aurangabad, India. © Simone D. McCourtie/World Bank.

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Mobilizing Youths (16-29 Years) through Entertainment-Education for Uptake of MenAfric Vaccination in Niger State, Nigeria

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Author: 
Chima E. Onuekwe
Publication Date
March 20, 2015
Affiliation: 

World Health Organization (WHO)

 

Source: 

Emails from Chima E. Anthony-Onuekwe to The Communication Initiative on March 28 2015 and August 30 2015. Image caption/credit: "Mickael made history in November 2012 when he became the first person ever in Africa to receive a MenAfriVac meningitis vaccine outside of the cold chain. It is made by Serum Institute of India. Photo: Sylvestre Tiendrebeogo/WHO"

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Is Educating Girls the magic bullet to end global poverty?

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Author: Juliet Le Breton, September 30 2015 - As a seasoned aid worker, it really worries me that many policy-makers imply that if we can just get girls to complete school, they can break out of poverty.

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10 Myths About Girls' Empowerment and Mobile Learning

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Author: Linda Raftree, September 9 2015 - I had the chance to share some thoughts at UNESCO's recent Mobile Learning Week. My presentation explored some myths about girls empowerment and mobile learning and offered suggestions of things to think about when designing and implementing programs.

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Protect children from defilement, teen pregnancy

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Author: Gillies C. Kasongo, September 30 2015 - The high number of defilements and teen pregnancies in rural Zambia is a cause for concern and requires concerted efforts to resolve.

The Penal Code (Chapter 87 of the Laws of Zambia) defines defilement as unlawful sexual intercourse with a girl-child below the age of 16 years. Sadly, defilement is rampant in Zambia.

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A girl without education is like a bird without wings

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Author: Trish Doherty, August 12 2015 - In a country where only one in ten girls complete primary education, Trish Doherty looks at how a BBC Media Action radio programme is helping more girls stay in school in South Sudan.

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Children's Rights in the Digital Age: A Download from Children Around the World

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Author: 
Amanda Third
Delphine Bellerose
Urszula Dawkins
Emma Keltie
Kari Pihl
Publication Date
October 1, 2014
Affiliation: 

Institute for Culture and Society (Third, Bellerose, Keltie, Pihl), lightblue.com.au (Dawkins)

"In regards to children's right to education and participation, children reported that being online enabled them to participate meaningfully. They valued the possibility offered by digital media to broaden their horizons, gain awareness of other cultures and be informed global citizens."

Source: 

UNICEF Publications website, accessed September 4 2015.

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Research Project: Rights of the Child for the Digital Age

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"How can we give children and young people voice in the debate that explores the impact of digital access and use and their rights?"

Communication Strategies: 

The project drew upon participatory research and design methodologies that emerged from a methodology design workshop with two Sydney, Australia-based members of the Young and Well CRC's Youth Brains Trust. Then, partner organisations were recruited through a call for Expressions of Interest (in English, French, and Spanish) sent out via the website, email distribution networks, and social media channels of the Digitally Connected Network and the Young and Well CRC. Drawing on the methodology design workshop, the research team produced a project resource kit for partner organisations; it provided ethical standards relating to the recruitment for and conduct of the workshops with children. Available in English, French, and Spanish, it also contained detailed explanations of the suggested workshop activities and details on how to submit content back to the research team.

 

In July and August 2014, having been recruited by the participating organisations, the children took part in workshops (held in Arabic, English, French, Italian, Malay, Portuguese, Spanish, and Turkish) to discuss the opportunities and risks associated with digital media. During the workshops, the children - hailing from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Colombia, Egypt, France, Ghana, Italy, Kenya, Malaysia, Nigeria, Philippines, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, and the United States of America - were asked to reflect upon the extent to which they used digital media and information and communication technologies (ICTs) in their everyday lives. They:

  • drew their own daily, weekly, or monthly "technology use timeline" in which they outlined their digital media use and related rights. To make this activity as inclusive as possible, workshop facilitators were asked to use a broad definition of media and technology so that children would be encouraged to also map their mass media engagements (radio, television, newspapers, and so on). The children were then asked to identify the challenges and opportunities associated with their media and technology use and map these onto their timeline. In the final stage of the activity, participants were encouraged to identify how their technology practices intersected, or not, with their rights by cutting out the relevant rights from a template provided by the workshop facilitator and matching them with the challenges and opportunities identified on their timelines. Children were also invited to invent their own rights, where they felt the existing rights did not capture their experience, and stick them on their timelines.
  • responded on camera to a series of "vox pop" questions on the opportunities and challenges digital media present in enacting their rights. These vox pops could be filmed on a digital camera, flip-camera, or mobile phone. Where these technologies were not available, or where participants were reluctant to be filmed, children were asked to write short written responses to the questions (e.g., "What is the biggest challenge digital media pose to your ability, and the ability of those around you, to live well?")
  • chose and explored a dimension of their rights in the digital age using one of 6 mediums (video, audio, photographs, drawing/painting, flip book, or written response). One example of a guiding question: "How does digital media enable you to enact change in your life and/or your community?"

The workshop resulted in 3 project outputs:

  1. A short film that documents children's insights into and experiences of their rights in the digital age using footage crowdsourced from children via the project's partner organisations.
  2. A scholarly report analysing the content generated by children who participated in the project in relation to the existing scholarship on children's rights in the digital age. [See related summaries, below.]
  3. A set of "digital champion" stories showcasing how children, or organisations working with children, are using technology to enhance the rights of children in different locations around the world. (See these stories, beginning on page 52 of this document "Children's Rights in the Digital Age: A Download from Children Around the World [PDF]".

 

The research team then conducted a content analysis of the children's timelines to identify key themes, commonalities, and differences. In conducting these analyses, the research team was very mindful that the project's key aim was to keep children's views at the core of the reporting.

 

Findings were then presented at the Day of General Discussion, a meeting focusing on digital media and child rights that was convened by the Committee on the Rights of the Child on September 12 2014. To read about the results, see the Related Summaries section, below.

Development Issues: 

Children, Youth, Rights, Technology, Education.

Key Points: 

"States Parties shall assure to the child who is capable of forming his or her own views the right to express those views freely in all matters affecting the child, the views of the child being given due weight in accordance with the age and maturity of the child." - Article 12: Convention on the Rights of the Child.

 

From "Children's Rights in the Digital Age: A Download from Children Around the World [PDF]": "[T]he global community is a long way from acknowledging and realising the potential of digital media to support children's rights. For example, for children in many parts of the world, consistent and quality access remains a challenge. Equally, many other children cannot access online resources in a language they can speak, and where this is possible, children consistently report that they have limited access to age-appropriate and quality information and entertainment (Livingstone and O’Neill, 2014). Many have not been provided the opportunity to reflect upon what their rights are, and how they might be implicated in the rise of digital media."

Partner Text: 

Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre (CRC), the Institute for Culture and Society at the University of Western Sydney, the Berkman Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, and UNICEF, in partnership with the Digitally Connected Network.

Source: 

"Children's Rights in the Digital Age: A Download from Children Around the World [PDF]", by Amanda Third, Delphine Bellerose, Urszula Dawkins, Emma Keltie, and Kari Pihl, October 2014.

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