10 to 14 years

The 10 to 14 years age group required by UNICEF Adolescent Health

Love9: Cambodia's youth show returns

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Author: Rithy Lomorpich (Yuki), November 24 2015 - Red carpet, flashing cameras and glamorously dressed people - no, it's not the Oscars, but the launch of the second series of Love9, a hugely popular TV show addressing sexual and reproductive health issues for young Cambodians through discussion and drama. To welcome the new series, I joined four members of the Love9 cast at one of the biggest cinemas in Phnom Penh for its first screening.

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The challenge of preventing violence and guaranteeing the right to protection

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Author: Verónica Bagnoli of Equidad para la Infancia, December 9 2015 - Crime and criminality acquired a connotation of "epidemic" in Brazil and other Latin American countries, the reason being great social unrest. For the first time in decades, crime has replaced unemployment as the main concern of the people of this region.

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Cultivate a culture of protecting children at community level

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Author: PSAf’s Gillies C. Kasongo, November 12 2015 - The fact that there are still community and media reports of children being abused through child neglect, defilement, exploitation and forced labour imply that more needs to be done to strengthen child protection systems at both the family and community level.

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The Urban Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health Social and Behavior Change Communications Implementation Kit

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Publication Date
Publication Date: 
October 20, 2015

"The social and cultural context surrounding young people growing up in urban areas is...different, in both positive and negative ways, affecting the health behaviors of young men and women, which can develop into repeated behaviors and habits that persist throughout adult life."

The Urban Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) Social and Behavior Change Communications (SBCC) Implementation Kit provides a selection of Essential Elements and tools to guide the creation, or strengthening, of SRH social and SBCC programmes for urban adolescents aged 10 to 19.

Published by the Health Communication Capacity Collaborative (HC3), the I-Kit breaks down and explains key SBCC elements to programme managers, designers, and implementers working with adolescents, SRH, and SBCC, as well as those in youth-led organisations. It includes worksheets to illustrate and facilitate each application.

Languages: 

English, French (I-Kit)

Number of Pages: 

15 (Supplement)

Source: 

HC3 website, November 3 2015; emails from Kim Martin to The Communication Initiative on November 10 and November 12 2015; HC3 website, May 9 2016; and HC3 website, December 6 2017.

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Beyond pro-life vs pro-choice

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Author: Ranjani K. Murthy, October 22 2015 - The world is divided around the issue of abortion. It is time we revisited what is choice.

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"I want to go to university to become a doctor"

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Author: Apune Jacob Alfred, October 13 2015 - The theme for this year's International Day of the Girl Child is the power of the adolescent girl and the vision for this generation of girls in 2030. As the day approaches, Apune Jacob Alfred reflects on the research he and colleagues at BBC Media Action have undertaken as part of the Girls’ Education programme in South Sudan.

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Preventing Violence against Women and Girls through Male Engagement: Exploring a National Evaluation Framework

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Publication Date
September 28, 2015

From The National Community of Practice (NCoP) and White Ribbon Canada, this national evaluation framework (NEF) is created "to provide guidance for organizations seeking to clarify intended impacts and outcomes resulting from gender-based violence prevention programming. It offers sample indicators across four levels of change and eight outcome areas, which can inform male engagement programming to respond and prevent violence against women and girls."

The main objectives of the NEF are the following:

Source: 

Email from Kate Bojin to The Communication Initiative on October 6 and 9 2015, and Preventing Violence against Women and Girls through Male Engagement: Exploring a National Evaluation Framework, October 8 2015.

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A National Evaluation Framework: Preventing Violence against Women and Girls through Male Engagement

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Publication Date
Publication Date: 
September 28, 2015

This national evaluation framework (NEF) is created "to provide guidance for organizations seeking to clarify intended impacts and outcomes resulting from gender-based violence [GBV] prevention programming."

The National Community of Practice (NCoP) of Canadian organisations working on gender violence and White Ribbon Canada collectively created the NEF to offer sample indicators across four levels of change and eight outcome areas in order to support organisations in measuring what works to create male engagement programming to respond to and prevent violence against women and girls. (See Related Summaries below for more on the process of its creation and on strategic objectives, challenges, and enabling factors.)

Number of Pages: 

20

Source: 

Email from Kate Bojin to The Communication Initiative on October 6 and 9 2015, and Preventing Violence against Women and Girls through Male Engagement: Exploring a National Evaluation Framework, October 8 2015.

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Open Institute Cambodia: Young Women's Leadership Network

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This project "Strengthening Capacity of Young Women’s Leadership Network" (YWLN) aims to increase the participation of young women, including young women and girls living with HIV (YW/GLHIV) and lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (LBT) people, "in political dialogue, and to raise awareness of the rights of YW/GLHIV and LBT people and the need for accountability to gender equality commitments" in Cambodia.

Communication Strategies: 

The project has the following four objectives:

  1. "Provide ... increased knowledge and skills to raise awareness of the rights of LBT and women and girls living with HIV/AIDS;
  2. Strengthen dialogue between rights holders and duty bearers at the subnational level to build demand for gender-responsive policy implementation;
  3. Improve capacity for collective advocacy by ...YW/GLHIV, and young LBTs... which is informed by awareness of their rights and influences public/policy dialogue on HIV and LBT; and
  4. Increase awareness of women’s human rights in relation to YW/GLHIV and young LBT persons."

 

Through a meeting of members of the Young Women’s Leadership Network with YW/GLHIV and LBT groups, a common set of messages and agenda began to emerge. Group discussion was conducted among the participants at the partnership engagement meeting to identify challenges, needs, and key messages to be voiced. The messages were: "to stop all forms of discrimination against YW/GLHIV and LBTs" and "that YW/GLHIV and LBTs have the same human rights as other people." Participants voiced challenges, such as: finding support, including family support, for education and healthcare; obtaining ID cards; and being subjected to forced marriages.

 

The attendees suggested the following needs and interventions:

  • A need for "capacity building on HIV and LBT awareness to communities to reduce discrimination against YW/GLHIV and LBT."
  • An "LBT request that the government stop discriminating against them and provide them with ID [identity] cards...."
  • A need for "educational materials for young girls living with HIV so that they can continue to go to school (they lack text books and other education materials)."
  • A request that government "create jobs for YW/GLHIV in communities or at the nearest villages."
  • A request to "have vocational training to YW/GLHIV and LBTs to have access to income generated and provide micro finance for them to start their own businesses after the training."
  • A request for authorities "to allow the young women, especially YW/GLHIV and LBT, to join commune council’s monthly or quarterly meetings to voice their concern and needs."
  • A need for "health care support and ARV [antiretroviral] regularly and free to the YW/GLHIV and LBTs (who are HIV affected)."

 

The project plans to build participant capacity for joint strategic advocacy on policy issues to address their collective concerns. This includes recognition of the "need to organize, bind together, and mount their actions upon a platform of solidarity. Thus, collective empowerment and action among the most marginalized is an approach that this project will test and attempt to prove as workable. Support will be provided to the development of a common agenda for advocacy and action; the adoption of a shared communication and information strategy; building capacities for advocacy; and pursuing opportunities to influence policy dialogues.... Underlying all of the processes and activities will be a systematic learning-by-doing, mentoring, coaching and technical guidance and capacity building interventions for skills of YWLN to lead joint advocacy and collective communications with YW/GLHIV and LBT." 

Development Issues: 

Education, Health, Gender, HIV, Rights, Women, Youth

Key Points: 

"The Cambodian Constitution states the right of all Cambodians to be treated equally. While Cambodian National laws and policies do not identify same-sex activities as a criminal offence, the rights of LGBT’s [lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender] are not stipulated in any laws or policies. There is no law sanctioning anti-discrimination or punishment for those who violate the rights of LBT people."

Partner Text: 

Open Institute, UN Women, YWLN, Cambodian People Living with HIV Network (CPN)+, Cambodian Community of Women (CCW), CamASEAN, CHEMS, Khmer Youth for Social Development (KYSD). The project also works with Commune Sangkat Council Association and with National AIDS Authority (NAA) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

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Voice and Agency: Empowering Women and Girls for Shared Prosperity

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Author: 
Jeni Klugman
Lucia Hanmer
Sarah Twigg
Tazeen Hasan
Jennifer McCleary-Sills
Julieth Santamaria
Publication Date
September 1, 2014
Affiliation: 

World Bank Group (Klugman, Hanmer, Twigg, Hasan, McCleary-Sills) Inter-American Development Bank (Santamaria)

 

Source: 

The World Bank Group's Open Knowledge Repository (OKR), accessed October 2 2015. Image caption/credit: A woman raises her hand to speak at a community meeting in Aurangabad, India. © Simone D. McCourtie/World Bank.

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