10 to 14 years

The 10 to 14 years age group required by UNICEF Adolescent Health

Protect children from defilement, teen pregnancy

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Author: Gillies C. Kasongo, September 30 2015 - The high number of defilements and teen pregnancies in rural Zambia is a cause for concern and requires concerted efforts to resolve.

The Penal Code (Chapter 87 of the Laws of Zambia) defines defilement as unlawful sexual intercourse with a girl-child below the age of 16 years. Sadly, defilement is rampant in Zambia.

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A girl without education is like a bird without wings

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Author: Trish Doherty, August 12 2015 - In a country where only one in ten girls complete primary education, Trish Doherty looks at how a BBC Media Action radio programme is helping more girls stay in school in South Sudan.

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Children's Rights in the Digital Age: A Download from Children Around the World

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Author: 
Amanda Third
Delphine Bellerose
Urszula Dawkins
Emma Keltie
Kari Pihl
Publication Date
October 1, 2014
Affiliation: 

Institute for Culture and Society (Third, Bellerose, Keltie, Pihl), lightblue.com.au (Dawkins)

"In regards to children's right to education and participation, children reported that being online enabled them to participate meaningfully. They valued the possibility offered by digital media to broaden their horizons, gain awareness of other cultures and be informed global citizens."

Source: 

UNICEF Publications website, accessed September 4 2015.

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Research Project: Rights of the Child for the Digital Age

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"How can we give children and young people voice in the debate that explores the impact of digital access and use and their rights?"

Communication Strategies: 

The project drew upon participatory research and design methodologies that emerged from a methodology design workshop with two Sydney, Australia-based members of the Young and Well CRC's Youth Brains Trust. Then, partner organisations were recruited through a call for Expressions of Interest (in English, French, and Spanish) sent out via the website, email distribution networks, and social media channels of the Digitally Connected Network and the Young and Well CRC. Drawing on the methodology design workshop, the research team produced a project resource kit for partner organisations; it provided ethical standards relating to the recruitment for and conduct of the workshops with children. Available in English, French, and Spanish, it also contained detailed explanations of the suggested workshop activities and details on how to submit content back to the research team.

 

In July and August 2014, having been recruited by the participating organisations, the children took part in workshops (held in Arabic, English, French, Italian, Malay, Portuguese, Spanish, and Turkish) to discuss the opportunities and risks associated with digital media. During the workshops, the children - hailing from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Colombia, Egypt, France, Ghana, Italy, Kenya, Malaysia, Nigeria, Philippines, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, and the United States of America - were asked to reflect upon the extent to which they used digital media and information and communication technologies (ICTs) in their everyday lives. They:

  • drew their own daily, weekly, or monthly "technology use timeline" in which they outlined their digital media use and related rights. To make this activity as inclusive as possible, workshop facilitators were asked to use a broad definition of media and technology so that children would be encouraged to also map their mass media engagements (radio, television, newspapers, and so on). The children were then asked to identify the challenges and opportunities associated with their media and technology use and map these onto their timeline. In the final stage of the activity, participants were encouraged to identify how their technology practices intersected, or not, with their rights by cutting out the relevant rights from a template provided by the workshop facilitator and matching them with the challenges and opportunities identified on their timelines. Children were also invited to invent their own rights, where they felt the existing rights did not capture their experience, and stick them on their timelines.
  • responded on camera to a series of "vox pop" questions on the opportunities and challenges digital media present in enacting their rights. These vox pops could be filmed on a digital camera, flip-camera, or mobile phone. Where these technologies were not available, or where participants were reluctant to be filmed, children were asked to write short written responses to the questions (e.g., "What is the biggest challenge digital media pose to your ability, and the ability of those around you, to live well?")
  • chose and explored a dimension of their rights in the digital age using one of 6 mediums (video, audio, photographs, drawing/painting, flip book, or written response). One example of a guiding question: "How does digital media enable you to enact change in your life and/or your community?"

The workshop resulted in 3 project outputs:

  1. A short film that documents children's insights into and experiences of their rights in the digital age using footage crowdsourced from children via the project's partner organisations.
  2. A scholarly report analysing the content generated by children who participated in the project in relation to the existing scholarship on children's rights in the digital age. [See related summaries, below.]
  3. A set of "digital champion" stories showcasing how children, or organisations working with children, are using technology to enhance the rights of children in different locations around the world. (See these stories, beginning on page 52 of this document "Children's Rights in the Digital Age: A Download from Children Around the World [PDF]".

 

The research team then conducted a content analysis of the children's timelines to identify key themes, commonalities, and differences. In conducting these analyses, the research team was very mindful that the project's key aim was to keep children's views at the core of the reporting.

 

Findings were then presented at the Day of General Discussion, a meeting focusing on digital media and child rights that was convened by the Committee on the Rights of the Child on September 12 2014. To read about the results, see the Related Summaries section, below.

Development Issues: 

Children, Youth, Rights, Technology, Education.

Key Points: 

"States Parties shall assure to the child who is capable of forming his or her own views the right to express those views freely in all matters affecting the child, the views of the child being given due weight in accordance with the age and maturity of the child." - Article 12: Convention on the Rights of the Child.

 

From "Children's Rights in the Digital Age: A Download from Children Around the World [PDF]": "[T]he global community is a long way from acknowledging and realising the potential of digital media to support children's rights. For example, for children in many parts of the world, consistent and quality access remains a challenge. Equally, many other children cannot access online resources in a language they can speak, and where this is possible, children consistently report that they have limited access to age-appropriate and quality information and entertainment (Livingstone and O’Neill, 2014). Many have not been provided the opportunity to reflect upon what their rights are, and how they might be implicated in the rise of digital media."

Partner Text: 

Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre (CRC), the Institute for Culture and Society at the University of Western Sydney, the Berkman Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, and UNICEF, in partnership with the Digitally Connected Network.

Source: 

"Children's Rights in the Digital Age: A Download from Children Around the World [PDF]", by Amanda Third, Delphine Bellerose, Urszula Dawkins, Emma Keltie, and Kari Pihl, October 2014.

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What Does Not Work in Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health: A Review of Evidence on Interventions Commonly Accepted as Best Practices

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Author: 
Venkatraman Chandra-Mouli
Catherine Lane
Sylvia Wong
Publication Date
August 31, 2015
Affiliation: 

World Health Organization (Chandra-Mouli), United States Agency for International Development, (Lane), United Nations Population Fund (Wong)

 

"Youth centers, peer education, and one-off public meetings have generally been ineffective in facilitating young people's access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, changing their behaviors, or influencing social norms around adolescent SRH. Approaches that have been found to be effective when well implemented, such as comprehensive sexuality education and youth-friendly services, have tended to flounder as they have considerable implementation requirements that are seldom met.

Source: 

Global Health: Science and Practice Journal of August 31 2015, accessed September 3 2015; and email to The Communication Iniative from Dr. Venkatraman Chandra-Mouli  on September 9 2015. Image credit: Save the Children

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EVIH-T - Haiti

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Launched in November 2013 and ongoing through 2017, this social and behaviour change communication (SBCC) campaign was carried out as part of the National AIDS Control Program’s (NACP) efforts in Haiti to create a collective, national response to the AIDS pandemic. The campaign’s goals were threefold: encourage Haitians to participate in the fight against HIV and AIDS, promote behaviours that reduce the risk of HIV transmission, and strengthen support for people living with HIV. The Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (JHU-CCP) worked with national and international non-governmental organisations in four departments to carry out the campaign.

 

Communication Strategies: 

The project involved: strengthening the capacity of Government of Haiti partners at the central and departmental levels; developing of NGO leadership; developing relationships with community and individuals; and offering HIV services, with the objectives of changing social norms and creating an enabling environment for the adoption of preventive behaviours, as well as increased demand for services and reduced stigma for those living with HIV.

 

EVIH-T supported World AIDS Day planning to promote the campaign and introduced the communication components of the campaign: banners in the streets, posters at health institutions and community organisations, SMS (text messaging) and robocalls, and radio spots airing on national radio. These media shared the same message: Sida! Mwen pap pran. Mwen pap bay. (AIDS! I’m not catching it. I’m not passing it on.) The radio spots were designed to promote personal responsibility, for example: “My life is my own. I have to protect it. "[...] I’m not taking any risks so the AIDS virus won’t get inside..." or "That’s why I’m controlling my sexual activity. I’m not hooking up with a bunch of partners right and left." The spots also addressed stigma and support issues for people living with HIV, e.g.: "I’ve been living with the AIDS virus now for three years. When I found out, I thought my life was over. But, thanks to the support of friends, family and coworkers, and also thanks to the medications I always take every day, I’m beginning to love life again. [...] I’m not giving my wife AIDS or anyone else. With all my strength, with all my conviction, I say: AIDS! I’m not passing it on!"

 

In August of 2014, a sport-involved campaign was added using the slogan "Sport for Life" as messaging on T-shirts and television and radio spots. (See the video below.)

Development Issues: 

HIV/AIDS, Health

Partner Text: 

The Foundation for Reproductive Health and Family Life Education (FOSREF), the Haitian Institute for Community Health (INHSAC) and Promoters of the Zero AIDS Objective (POZ), USAID, JHU-CCP, Jhpiego, Save the Children.

See video
Source: 

JHU-CCP website and USAID website, September 1 2015. Image credit: Johns Hopkins University Center for Global Health

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Sheepa Hafiza - Director of Gender, Justice, Diversity and Migration, BRAC - DFID Girl Summit 2014

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"Sexual harassment in public places is found to be one of the major causes of girls’ dropping out of school; this causes an increase in child and early forced marriage." Sheepa Hafiza

Panel Discussion: Spotlight on Progress "Securing the Way to Healthy Adulthood and Leadership for Girls"

Source: 

DFID Girl Summit Outcomes website, the BRAC website, Eliminating Sexual Harassment of Girls in Bangladesh, and Gender Equality and Women's Empowerment blogspot, accessed on August 26 2015; and email from Sheepa Hafiza to The Communication Initiative on August 31 2015.

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Furaha Pascal Karimiko - Moving The Goalposts (MTG) Coach, Woman Win, Kenya - DFID Girl Summit 2014

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"I learned about my rights... my right to play and to choose what I wanted to become." Furaha Pascal Karimiko

Panel Discussion: Spotlight on Progress "Securing the Way to Healthy Adulthood and Leadership for Girls"

Source: 

DFID Girl Summit Outcomes website and Women Win website, accessed on August 26 2015.

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Karen Austrian - Population Council - DFID Girl Summit 2014

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"The Adolescent Girls Empowerment Programme is for the most vulnerable girls ages 10-19 in Zambia….Evidence shows that economic aspects of girls’ lives can act as key barriers in translating health knowledge into health behaviour change.” Karen Austrian

Panel Discussion: Spotlight on Progress "Securing the Way to Healthy Adulthood and Leadership for Girls"

Source: 

DFID Girl Summit Outcomes website and the Population Council website, accessed on August 26 2015.

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Iwalola Akin-Jimoh - Executive Director, Ovie Brume Foundation, Vital Voices Fellowship Program, Nigeria - DFID Girl Summit 2014

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"What we did was primarily to build the life skills of young people... and we also used sports... to build their self-confidence and self-esteem... We give them capacities in such a way that they can ...build communities and address various community issues, depending on what they identify as parity for the community." Iwalola Akin-Jimoh

Panel Discussion: Spotlight on Progress "Securing the Way to Healthy Adulthood and Leadership for Girls"

Source: 

DFID Girl Summit Outcomes website, the Vital Voices website, and the OBF website, accessed on August 26 2015, and email from Mrs. Akin-Jimoh to The Communication Initiative on September 27 2015.

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