BBC Media Action's blog

Women and girl's rights in Sierra Leone: Let Us Know!

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Author: Olabisi Olu Garrick, February 23 2015 - Despite my fourteen years as a journalist, I didn’t always want to work in the media. I actually wanted to be a lawyer.

The ability to hold people to account and help people understand their legal rights always appealed to me. Little did I know that a chance meeting with a woman one sunny afternoon would change my life.

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A novel approach to maternal health in Nigeria

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Author: Producer Trainer for BBC Media Action in Nigeria Akile Gojo, originally posted December 5 2017 - Earlier this year, after a day of training producers at one of our partner radio stations in Gombe state, I was eating dinner in a nearby restaurant. In the background, a radio was playing, and, as I sat there, I realised that all the women - and some men as well - were listening intently to a novel being read aloud on air.

I knew listening to romance novels on the radio - especially those written by local authors - has been growing in popularity with women and girls in Northern Nigeria. They often go to the market to buy copies of their favourites to read again at home with family.

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How can media and communication address violence against women and girls?

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Authors: BBC Media Action Gender advisors Kanwal Ahluwalia and Elanor Jackson, originally posted November 30 2017 - We are often asked what a gender transformative project looks like.

A gender transformative approach explicitly tackles social norms around gender discrimination, power and violence, as well as broader ideas about male superiority and what it is to be a "real man" or "real woman" in the eyes of society. It means addressing systemic change by looking beyond individuals and focusing on unequal power relations between women and men, girls and boys.

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How we attracted women to our shows

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Author: Head of Research and Learning, BBC Media Action Nigeria, Anu Mohammed, originally posted November 22 2017 - As a child and throughout my teenage years in northern Nigeria, I saw men in our neighbourhood shopping for the food needed by the family. To my young mind, this was fascinating, and I thought “how helpful and thoughtful of them”.

It was only later I came to understand that, for cultural reasons, women were not expected to be seen in public. But deep down, I still couldn’t understand it.

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Coping with conflict: making media to support children in Syria

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Author: BBC Media Action's Assistant Project Manager in Syria Julie Boutros, originally posted November 19 2017 - As the world marks Universal Children’s Day, Julie Boutros describes how we're helping children in Syria survive and cope with the conflict. By supporting media based in the country to make tailored 'lifeline' content - animations, radio dramas, discussion programmes and a documentary - we're tackling issues around child rights, development and survival.

Children in Syria have paid the heaviest price in a conflict that has affected their daily lives for more than six years. Going to school, playing outdoors, or enjoying a healthy and safe life has become difficult for many children living in areas affected by conflict.

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Using human-centred design to achieve your goals

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Authors: Radharani Mitra, originally posted November 7 2017 - This blog was originally posted on India Development Review (IDR’s) Practice blog.

One can’t talk about design without quoting Steve Jobs.

"Design is a funny word," he said, "Some people think design is how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it’s really how it works." He hit the bullseye as always. Look at the success of design-driven companies like AirBnB and Pinterest, or even digital giants like Google, eBay and LinkedIn, who have invested in the design of more engaging and differentiated user experiences.

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The story of Story Story: 13 years of drama making a difference in Nigeria

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Author: BBC Media Action Nigeria's Head of Production and Training Deji Arosho, originally posted October 20 2017 - After more than 13 years, over 500 episodes and even a visit from The Queen, Story Story: Voices from the Market, is taking a break. As the last episode was broadcast on Sunday, Deji Arosho looks back at the history of the popular radio drama and its impact on listeners.

If you are not one of the 17 million Nigerians who regularly listen to Story Story: Voices from the Market let me fill you in.

Back in 2003 BBC Media Action created a radio drama to reflect the lives of ordinary Nigerians and to help them understand the issues impacting their lives. Set in a fictional market and motor park – places every large town in Nigeria has - we describe it as "somewhere in West Africa, somewhere near you".

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Home safe home: helping people in Nepal 'build back better'

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Authors: BBC Media Action Nepal's Stakeholder Liaison, Pratibha Tuladhar, originally posted October 12 2017On International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction we explore how Sajha Sawal - our TV current affairs show in Nepal – is helping communities displaced by the 2015 earthquakes get the support they need to rebuild safer homes in safer locations. No easy feat.

"My eyes are burning" says Mishri Lama as she prepares dinner in the temporary shelter that has been her family’s home since she was displaced by the devastating earthquake that hit Nepal in 2015.

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Flying solo after training with BBC Question Time

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Authors: Ali Sharif and Rob Hopkin, originally posted October 4 2017 - Ali Sharif, 27, wanted to be an airline pilot but after joining BBC Media Action’s training programme in North Africa - and with help from BBC Question Time director Rob Hopkin - he is now the director of Hiwar Mushtarak, a TV debate show increasing people’s knowledge of current affairs and holding power to account in Libya.

Ali:

When I was growing up I really wanted to be an airline pilot like my Dad. Flying fascinates me – so I gravitated towards studying aviation. But it just wasn’t meant to be. Money was tight and I couldn’t afford to complete my private pilot’s licence.

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What the development sector can learn from audience segmentation

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Author: BBC Media Action Senior Research Manager Sophie Baskett, originally posted September 27 2017 - In the not-for-profit sector we’ve already learned a lot from marketing techniques developed in the commercial world.

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